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Why early adopters engage in interpersonal diffusion of technological innovations: An empirical study on electric bicycles and electric scooters

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  • Seebauer, Sebastian

Abstract

Early adopters promoting electric vehicles in their social network may speed up market uptake of this technology. Apart from their opinion leader status, few previous research details the motivations which turn early adopters into advocates for innovation who approach the non-adopters among their family and friends, or casual acquaintances.

Suggested Citation

  • Seebauer, Sebastian, 2015. "Why early adopters engage in interpersonal diffusion of technological innovations: An empirical study on electric bicycles and electric scooters," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 146-160.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:78:y:2015:i:c:p:146-160
    DOI: 10.1016/j.tra.2015.04.017
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Egbue, Ona & Long, Suzanna, 2012. "Barriers to widespread adoption of electric vehicles: An analysis of consumer attitudes and perceptions," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 717-729.
    2. Wolf, Angelika & Seebauer, Sebastian, 2014. "Technology adoption of electric bicycles: A survey among early adopters," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 196-211.
    3. Jonn Axsen & Kenneth S Kurani, 2012. "Interpersonal influence within car buyers' social networks: applying five perspectives to plug-in hybrid vehicle drivers," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 44(5), pages 1047-1065, May.
    4. Turrentine, Tom & Garas, Dahlia & Lentz, Andy & Woodjack, Justin, 2011. "The UC Davis MINI E Consumer Study," Institute of Transportation Studies, Working Paper Series qt15g9v24c, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Davis.
    5. Steenkamp, Jan-Benedict E M & Baumgartner, Hans, 1998. " Assessing Measurement Invariance in Cross-National Consumer Research," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 25(1), pages 78-90, June.
    6. Eppstein, Margaret J. & Grover, David K. & Marshall, Jeffrey S. & Rizzo, Donna M., 2011. "An agent-based model to study market penetration of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 3789-3802, June.
    7. Franke, Thomas & Krems, Josef F., 2013. "Interacting with limited mobility resources: Psychological range levels in electric vehicle use," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 109-122.
    8. Meade, Nigel & Islam, Towhidul, 2006. "Modelling and forecasting the diffusion of innovation - A 25-year review," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 519-545.
    9. Robert Cialdini, 2007. "Descriptive Social Norms as Underappreciated Sources of Social Control," Psychometrika, Springer;The Psychometric Society, vol. 72(2), pages 263-268, June.
    10. Schuitema, Geertje & Anable, Jillian & Skippon, Stephen & Kinnear, Neale, 2013. "The role of instrumental, hedonic and symbolic attributes in the intention to adopt electric vehicles," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 39-49.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Synek, Stefan & Koenigstorfer, Joerg, 2018. "Exploring adoption determinants of tax-subsidized company-leasing bicycles from the perspective of German employers and employees," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 238-260.
    2. Hardman, Scott & Shiu, Eric & Steinberger-Wilckens, Robert & Turrentine, Thomas, 2017. "Barriers to the adoption of fuel cell vehicles: A qualitative investigation into early adopters attitudes," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 166-182.
    3. Seebauer, Sebastian, 2017. "Individual Drivers for Direct and Indirect Rebound Effects: A Survey Study of Electric Vehicles and Building Insulation in Austria," FCN Working Papers 17/2017, E.ON Energy Research Center, Future Energy Consumer Needs and Behavior (FCN).
    4. Georgia Apostolou & Angèle Reinders & Karst Geurs, 2018. "An Overview of Existing Experiences with Solar-Powered E-Bikes," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(8), pages 1-20, August.
    5. Thomas, Alainna, 2016. "A More Sustainable Minivan? An Exploratory Study of Electric Bicycle Use by San Francisco Bay Area Families," Institute of Transportation Studies, Working Paper Series qt6g79m3xx, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Davis.
    6. repec:wsi:ijimxx:v:21:y:2017:i:08:n:s1363919617400102 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Julian M. Müller, 2019. "Comparing Technology Acceptance for Autonomous Vehicles, Battery Electric Vehicles, and Car Sharing—A Study across Europe, China, and North America," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(16), pages 1-17, August.

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