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To what extent do biomarkers account for the large social disparities in health in Moscow?

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Listed:
  • Glei, Dana A.
  • Goldman, Noreen
  • Shkolnikov, Vladimir M.
  • Jdanov, Dmitri
  • Shalnova, Svetlana
  • Shkolnikova, Maria
  • Weinstein, Maxine

Abstract

The Russian population continues to face political and economic challenges, has experienced poor general health and high mortality for decades, and has exhibited widening health disparities. The physiological factors underlying links between health and socioeconomic position in the Russian population are therefore an important topic to investigate. We used data from a population-based survey of Moscow residents aged 55 and older (n = 1495), fielded between December 2006 and June 2009, to address two questions. First, are social disparities evident across different clusters of biomarkers? Second, does biological risk mediate the link between socioeconomic status and health?

Suggested Citation

  • Glei, Dana A. & Goldman, Noreen & Shkolnikov, Vladimir M. & Jdanov, Dmitri & Shalnova, Svetlana & Shkolnikova, Maria & Weinstein, Maxine, 2013. "To what extent do biomarkers account for the large social disparities in health in Moscow?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 164-172.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:77:y:2013:i:c:p:164-172
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2012.11.022
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Davillas, A.; Jones, A.M.; Benzeval, M.;, 2017. "The income-health gradient: Evidence from self-reported health and biomarkers using longitudinal data on income," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 17/04, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    2. Todd, Megan A. & Shkolnikov, Vladimir M. & Goldman, Noreen, 2016. "Why are well-educated Muscovites more likely to survive? Understanding the biological pathways," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 157(C), pages 138-147.

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