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Biological mechanisms of disease and death in Moscow: rationale and design of the survey on Stress Aging and Health in Russia (SAHR)

Author

Listed:
  • Maria A. Shkolnikova

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

  • Svetlana A. Shalnova

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

  • Vladimir M. Shkolnikov

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

  • Victoria A. Metelskaya

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

  • Alexander D. Deev

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

  • Evgueni M. Andreev

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

  • Dmitri A. Jdanov

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

  • James W. Vaupel

    (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany)

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Maria A. Shkolnikova & Svetlana A. Shalnova & Vladimir M. Shkolnikov & Victoria A. Metelskaya & Alexander D. Deev & Evgueni M. Andreev & Dmitri A. Jdanov & James W. Vaupel, 2009. "Biological mechanisms of disease and death in Moscow: rationale and design of the survey on Stress Aging and Health in Russia (SAHR)," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2009-016, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:dem:wpaper:wp-2009-016
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    File URL: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2009-016.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Irina Denisova, 2009. "Mortality in Russia: Microanalysis," Working Papers w0128, Center for Economic and Financial Research (CEFIR).
    2. Elizabeth Brainerd & David M. Cutler, 2005. "Autopsy on an Empire: Understanding Mortality in Russia and the Former Soviet Union," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, pages 107-130.
    3. Cockerham, William C., 2000. "Health lifestyles in Russia," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, pages 1313-1324.
    4. Hart, Carole L. & Davey Smith, George & Blane, David, 1998. "Social mobility and 21Â year mortality in a cohort of Scottish men," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, pages 1121-1130.
    5. Stillman, Steven, 2006. "Health and nutrition in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union during the decade of transition: A review of the literature," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, pages 104-146.
    6. Shkolnikov, Vladimir M. & Cornia, Giovanni A. & Leon, David A. & Mesle, France, 1998. "Causes of the Russian mortality crisis: Evidence and interpretations," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 26(11), pages 1995-2011, November.
    7. Siegrist, Johannes, 2000. "Place, social exchange and health: proposed sociological framework," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, pages 1283-1293.
    8. FFF1Vladimir M. NNN1Shkolnikov & FFF2Valeriy V. NNN2Chervyakov & FFF2David A. NNN2Leon & FFF2Martin NNN2McKee, 2004. "Russian mortality beyond vital statistics," Demographic Research Special Collections, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 2(4), pages 71-104, April.
    9. Riphahn, Regina T. & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 1998. "The Mortality Crisis in East Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 6, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Glei, Dana A. & Goldman, Noreen & Shkolnikov, Vladimir M. & Jdanov, Dmitri & Shalnova, Svetlana & Shkolnikova, Maria & Weinstein, Maxine, 2013. "To what extent do biomarkers account for the large social disparities in health in Moscow?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, pages 164-172.
    2. Todd, Megan A. & Shkolnikov, Vladimir M. & Goldman, Noreen, 2016. "Why are well-educated Muscovites more likely to survive? Understanding the biological pathways," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, pages 138-147.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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