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Perceived job insecurity and worker health in the United States

Author

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  • Burgard, Sarah A.
  • Brand, Jennie E.
  • House, James S.

Abstract

Economic recessions, the industrial shift from manufacturing toward service industries, and rising global competition have contributed to uncertainty about job security, with potential consequences for workers' health. To address limitations of prior research on the health consequences of perceived job insecurity, we use longitudinal data from two nationally-representative samples of the United States population, and examine episodic and persistent perceived job insecurity over periods of about three years to almost a decade. Results show that persistent perceived job insecurity is a significant and substantively important predictor of poorer self-rated health in the American's Changing Lives (ACL) and Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) samples, and of depressive symptoms among ACL respondents. Job losses or unemployment episodes are associated with perceived job insecurity, but do not account for its association with health. Results are robust to controls for sociodemographic and job characteristics, negative reporting style, and earlier health and health behaviors.

Suggested Citation

  • Burgard, Sarah A. & Brand, Jennie E. & House, James S., 2009. "Perceived job insecurity and worker health in the United States," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 69(5), pages 777-785, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:69:y:2009:i:5:p:777-785
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Tapia Granados, José A. & Rodriguez, Javier M., 2015. "Health, economic crisis, and austerity: A comparison of Greece, Finland and Iceland," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 119(7), pages 941-953.
    2. Ambugo, Eliva A., 2014. "Cross-country variation in the sociodemographic factors associated with major depressive episode in Norway, the United Kingdom, Ghana, and Kenya," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 154-160.
    3. Berchick, Edward R. & Gallo, William T. & Maralani, Vida & Kasl, Stanislav V., 2012. "Inequality and the association between involuntary job loss and depressive symptoms," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(10), pages 1891-1894.
    4. Monsivais, Pablo & Martin, Adam & Suhrcke, Marc & Forouhi, Nita G. & Wareham, Nicholas J., 2015. "Job-loss and weight gain in British adults: Evidence from two longitudinal studies," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 143(C), pages 223-231.
    5. Gutierrez, Italo A. & Michaud, Pierre-Carl, 2015. "Employer Downsizing and Older Workers' Health," IZA Discussion Papers 9140, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Jon D. Wisman & Aaron Pacitti, 2017. "Guaranteed Employment and Universal Child Care For a New Social Contract," Working Papers 2017-05, American University, Department of Economics.
    7. Reeves, Aaron & McKee, Martin & Basu, Sanjay & Stuckler, David, 2014. "The political economy of austerity and healthcare: Cross-national analysis of expenditure changes in 27 European nations 1995–2011," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 115(1), pages 1-8.
    8. Jara Tamayo, Holguer Xavier, 2013. "The effect of job insecurity on labour supply," ISER Working Paper Series 2013-16, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    9. Schneider, William & Waldfogel, Jane & Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne, 2017. "The Great Recession and risk for child abuse and neglect," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 71-81.
    10. Kim, Il-Ho & Muntaner, Carles & Vahid Shahidi, Faraz & Vives, Alejandra & Vanroelen, Christophe & Benach, Joan, 2012. "Welfare states, flexible employment, and health: A critical review," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 104(2), pages 99-127.
    11. repec:zbw:rwirep:0379 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Granados, José A. Tapia, 2010. "Politics and health in eight European countries: A comparative study of mortality decline under social democracies and right-wing governments," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 71(5), pages 841-850, September.
    13. Marcus Klemm, 2012. "Job Security and Fertility: Evidence from German Reunification," Ruhr Economic Papers 0379, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    14. Italo A. Gutierrez & Pierre-Carl Michaud, 2017. "Whistle While You Work: Job Insecurity and Older Workers' Mental Health in the United States," Cahiers de recherche 1702, Chaire de recherche Industrielle Alliance sur les enjeux économiques des changements démographiques.
    15. King, Tanya & Kilpatrick, Sue & Willis, Karen & Speldewinde, Christopher, 2015. "“A Different Kettle of Fish”: Mental health strategies for Australian fishers, and farmers," Marine Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 134-140.
    16. Nishikitani, Mariko & Tsurugano, Shinobu & Inoue, Mariko & Yano, Eiji, 2012. "Effect of unequal employment status on workers’ health: Results from a Japanese national survey," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(3), pages 439-451.
    17. Klemm, Marcus, 2012. "Job Security and Fertility: Evidence from German Reunification," Ruhr Economic Papers 379, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    18. Anne Annink & Laura Dulk & Bram Steijn, 2016. "Work–Family Conflict Among Employees and the Self-Employed Across Europe," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 126(2), pages 571-593, March.
    19. Marjanovic, Zdravko & Greenglass, Esther R. & Fiksenbaum, Lisa & De Witte, Hans & Garcia-Santos, Francisco & Buchwald, Petra & Peiró, José María & Mañas, Miguel A., 2015. "Evaluation of the Financial Threat Scale (FTS) in four European, non-student samples," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 72-80.
    20. Elena Cottini & Paolo Ghinetti, 2016. "Employment insecurity and employees’ health in Denmark," DISCE - Working Papers del Dipartimento di Economia e Finanza def045, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Dipartimenti e Istituti di Scienze Economiche (DISCE).

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