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Did the Great Recession affect mortality rates in the metropolitan United States? Effects on mortality by age, gender and cause of death

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  • Strumpf, Erin C.
  • Charters, Thomas J.
  • Harper, Sam
  • Nandi, Arijit

Abstract

Mortality rates generally decline during economic recessions in high-income countries, however gaps remain in our understanding of the underlying mechanisms. This study estimates the impacts of increases in unemployment rates on both all-cause and cause-specific mortality across U.S. metropolitan regions during the Great Recession.

Suggested Citation

  • Strumpf, Erin C. & Charters, Thomas J. & Harper, Sam & Nandi, Arijit, 2017. "Did the Great Recession affect mortality rates in the metropolitan United States? Effects on mortality by age, gender and cause of death," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 189(C), pages 11-16.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:189:y:2017:i:c:p:11-16
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2017.07.016
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. Kritee Gujral & Anirban Basu, 2019. "Impact of Rural and Urban Hospital Closures on Inpatient Mortality," NBER Working Papers 26182, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Chiachi Bonnie Lee & Chen-Mao Liao & Li-Hsin Peng & Chih-Ming Lin, 2019. "Economic fluctuations and cardiovascular diseases: A multiple-input time series analysis," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 14(8), pages 1-19, August.

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