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Decomposing socio-economic inequality in colorectal cancer screening uptake in England

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  • Solmi, Francesca
  • Von Wagner, Christian
  • Kobayashi, Lindsay C.
  • Raine, Rosalind
  • Wardle, Jane
  • Morris, Stephen

Abstract

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second largest cause of cancer death in the UK. Since 2010, CRC screening based on Faecal Occult Blood testing has been offered by the NHS in England biennially to all persons age 60–69 years. Several studies have demonstrated a gradient in uptake using area-level markers of socio-economic status (SES), but few have examined the individual-level contributors to the gradient. We aimed to quantify the extent of SES inequality in CRC screening uptake in England using individual-level data, and to identify individual factors associated with this inequality.

Suggested Citation

  • Solmi, Francesca & Von Wagner, Christian & Kobayashi, Lindsay C. & Raine, Rosalind & Wardle, Jane & Morris, Stephen, 2015. "Decomposing socio-economic inequality in colorectal cancer screening uptake in England," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 76-86.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:134:y:2015:i:c:p:76-86
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2015.04.010
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Kehinde O. Omotoso & Steven F. Koch, 2017. "Social Determinants of Health Inequalities in South Africa: A Decomposition Analysis," Working Papers 201716, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.

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