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Inequalities in institutional delivery uptake and maternal mortality reduction in the context of cash incentive program, Janani Suraksha Yojana: Results from nine states in India

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  • Randive, Bharat
  • San Sebastian, Miguel
  • De Costa, Ayesha
  • Lindholm, Lars

Abstract

Proportion of women giving birth in health institutions has increased sharply in India since the introduction of cash incentive program, Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY) in 2005. JSY was intended to benefit disadvantaged population who had poor access to institutional care for childbirth and who bore the brunt of maternal deaths. Increase in institutional deliveries following the implementation of JSY needs to be analysed from an equity perspective. We analysed data from nine Indian states to examine the change in socioeconomic inequality in institutional deliveries five years after the implementation of JSY using the concentration curve and concentration index (CI). The CI was then decomposed in order to understand pathways through which observed inequalities occurred. Disparities in access to emergency obstetric care (EmOC) and in maternal mortality reduction among different socioeconomic groups were also assessed. Slope and relative index of inequality were used to estimate absolute and relative inequalities in maternal mortality ratio (MMR).

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  • Randive, Bharat & San Sebastian, Miguel & De Costa, Ayesha & Lindholm, Lars, 2014. "Inequalities in institutional delivery uptake and maternal mortality reduction in the context of cash incentive program, Janani Suraksha Yojana: Results from nine states in India," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 123(C), pages 1-6.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:123:y:2014:i:c:p:1-6
    DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2014.10.042
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    Cited by:

    1. Susmita Baulia, 2020. "Cash incentives to mothers or to community health workers - what contributes better to the health of the mother and the newborn? Evidence from India," Discussion Papers 133, Aboa Centre for Economics.
    2. Mohamad A. Khaled & Paul Makdissi & Rami V. Tabri & Myra Yazbeck, 2018. "A framework for testing the equality between the health concentration curve and the 45‐degree line," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(5), pages 887-896, May.
    3. Naresh Kumar & Ritu Rani, 2020. "Extent of Social Change in Family Quality of Life Index: Empirical Evidence from Selected States of India," South Asian Survey, , vol. 27(1), pages 62-80, March.
    4. Pal, Sarmistha, 2015. "Impact of hospital delivery on child mortality: An analysis of adolescent mothers in Bangladesh," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 143(C), pages 194-203.
    5. Vellakkal, Sukumar & Reddy, Hanimi & Gupta, Adyya & Chandran, Anil & Fledderjohann, Jasmine & Stuckler, David, 2017. "A qualitative study of factors impacting accessing of institutional delivery care in the context of India's cash incentive program," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 178(C), pages 55-65.
    6. Aizawa, T.;, 2019. "Reviewing the Existing Evidence of the Conditional Cash Transfer in India through the Partial Identification Approach," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 19/24, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.

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