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Followers and leaders: Reciprocity, social norms and group behavior

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  • López-Pérez, Raúl

Abstract

This paper proposes a model of norm-driven preferences and studies the determinants of norm compliance in games. It predicts that (i) compliance follows a law of demand and (ii) people respect norms in a reciprocal manner: they are more likely to comply if others are expected to comply too. Reciprocal norm compliance might explain why successful revolutions or strikes grow in a snow-balled fashion, leaders motivate others to join social movements, or sequential mechanisms (instead of simultaneous ones) are usually employed in charity fundraising.

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  • López-Pérez, Raúl, 2009. "Followers and leaders: Reciprocity, social norms and group behavior," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 557-567, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:38:y:2009:i:4:p:557-567
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Gaoussou DIARRA & Sébastien MARCHAND, 2011. "Does Pervasive Corruption Matter For Firm's Demand for Good Governance in Developing Countries?," Working Papers 201112, CERDI.
    2. repec:spr:grdene:v:23:y:2014:i:5:d:10.1007_s10726-013-9370-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Riener, Gerhard & Traxler, Christian, 2012. "Norms, moods, and free lunch: Longitudinal evidence on payments from a Pay-What-You-Want restaurant," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 476-483.

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