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A model of the travel to work limits of parents

Listed author(s):
  • McQuaid, Ronald W.

This paper considers the length of time that parents are willing to travel to an existing or new job. Using data for over 12,000 parents it finds that many characteristics were associated with being less likely to be willing to travel to work for at least an hour (roundtrip). These include: being a women, those out of work, having children under 5, being a lone parent and using formal childcare. Professionals and associate professions were more willing to travel for longer periods. In terms of location, those in accessible small towns and rural areas were willing to travel more than those in larger urban areas and those in remote rural areas willing to travel most. Policy implications are also set out.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Research in Transportation Economics.

Volume (Year): 25 (2009)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 19-28

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Handle: RePEc:eee:retrec:v:25:y:2009:i:1:p:19-28
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