IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/rensus/v25y2013icp580-595.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Energy for economic growth, industrialization, environment and natural resources: Living with just enough

Author

Listed:
  • Mudakkar, Syeda Rabab
  • Zaman, Khalid
  • Khan, Muhammad Mushtaq
  • Ahmad, Mehboob

Abstract

This study investigates the causal relationship between energy consumption (i.e., nuclear energy consumption, electricity power consumption and fossil fuels energy consumption) and economic growth; energy consumption and industrialization (i.e., industrial GDP, beverages and cigarettes); energy consumption and environmental degradation (i.e., carbon dioxide emissions, population density and water resources); and finally, energy consumption and resource depletion (i.e., mineral depletion, energy depletion, natural depletion and net forest depletion) in Pakistan over a period of 1975–2011. The Granger causality (GC) test in the frequency domain using the Pierce framework has been employed. This GC test in the frequency domain relies on a modified version of the coefficient of coherence, which they estimate in a nonparametric fashion and for which they derive the distributional properties. The results infer that there exists uni-directional causality running from nuclear energy to industrial GDP, nuclear energy to water resources; and nuclear energy to carbon dioxide emissions but not vice versa. Similarly, electric power consumption Granger cause agriculture GDP but not other way around, further, there is a bi-directional causality running between electric power consumption to population density in Pakistan. Fossil fuel Granger cause industrial GDP and there is a bidirectional causality running between fossil fuel and population density. Moreover, the findings show that the nature of causality among nuclear energy consumption & agriculture; nuclear energy consumption & population density; electric power consumption & cigarettes production; fossil fuel & cigarettes; and fossil fuels and agriculture value added are in favour of the neutrality hypothesis in Pakistan. The conclusion has been strengthen and have a very strong implications in the context of Pakistan, where we have economic and financial constraints, and thus agreeing the bottom line, “living with the just enough”.

Suggested Citation

  • Mudakkar, Syeda Rabab & Zaman, Khalid & Khan, Muhammad Mushtaq & Ahmad, Mehboob, 2013. "Energy for economic growth, industrialization, environment and natural resources: Living with just enough," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 580-595.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:rensus:v:25:y:2013:i:c:p:580-595
    DOI: 10.1016/j.rser.2013.05.024
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364032113003274
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ozturk, Ilhan & Aslan, Alper & Kalyoncu, Huseyin, 2010. "Energy consumption and economic growth relationship: Evidence from panel data for low and middle income countries," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 38(8), pages 4422-4428, August.
    2. James E. Payne, 2010. "Survey of the international evidence on the causal relationship between energy consumption and growth," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 37(1), pages 53-95, January.
    3. Shahbaz, Muhammad & Lean, Hooi Hooi & Farooq, Abdul, 2013. "Natural gas consumption and economic growth in Pakistan," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 18(C), pages 87-94.
    4. Thoma, Mark, 2004. "Electrical energy usage over the business cycle," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 463-485, May.
    5. Dipa Adhikari & Yanying Chen, 2013. "Energy Consumption and Economic Growth: A Panel Cointegration Analysis for Developing Countries," Review of Economics & Finance, Better Advances Press, Canada, vol. 3, pages 68-80, May.
    6. Benassy-Quere, Agnes & Mignon, Valerie & Penot, Alexis, 2007. "China and the relationship between the oil price and the dollar," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(11), pages 5795-5805, November.
    7. Schilling, Markus & Chiang, Lichun, 2011. "The effect of natural resources on a sustainable development policy: The approach of non-sustainable externalities," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 990-998, February.
    8. Soytas, Ugur & Sari, Ramazan, 2003. "Energy consumption and GDP: causality relationship in G-7 countries and emerging markets," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 33-37, January.
    9. Peura, Pekka, 2013. "From Malthus to sustainable energy—Theoretical orientations to reforming the energy sector," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 19(C), pages 309-327.
    10. Sadorsky, Perry, 2013. "Do urbanization and industrialization affect energy intensity in developing countries?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 52-59.
    11. Tsangyao Chang & Hsiao-Ping Chu & Wen-Yi Chen, 2013. "Energy consumption and economic growth in 12 Asian countries: panel data analysis," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(3), pages 282-287, February.
    12. David I. Stern and Astrid Kander, 2012. "The Role of Energy in the Industrial Revolution and Modern Economic Growth," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 3).
    13. Chu, Hsiao-Ping & Chang, Tsangyao, 2012. "Nuclear energy consumption, oil consumption and economic growth in G-6 countries: Bootstrap panel causality test," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 762-769.
    14. Granger, C W J, 1969. "Investigating Causal Relations by Econometric Models and Cross-Spectral Methods," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 37(3), pages 424-438, July.
    15. Lemmens, Aurélie & Croux, Christophe & Dekimpe, Marnik G., 2008. "Measuring and testing Granger causality over the spectrum: An application to European production expectation surveys," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 414-431.
    16. Breitung, Jorg & Candelon, Bertrand, 2006. "Testing for short- and long-run causality: A frequency-domain approach," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 132(2), pages 363-378, June.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Arnold, Uwe & Yildiz, Özgür, 2015. "Economic risk analysis of decentralized renewable energy infrastructures – A Monte Carlo Simulation approach," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 227-239.
    2. Rabab Mudakkar, Syeda & Zaman, Khalid & Shakir, Huma & Arif, Mariam & Naseem, Imran & Naz, Lubna, 2013. "Determinants of energy consumption function in SAARC countries: Balancing the odds," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 566-574.
    3. Zeng, Ziqiang & Nasri, Ehsan & Chini, Abdol & Ries, Robert & Xu, Jiuping, 2015. "A multiple objective decision making model for energy generation portfolio under fuzzy uncertainty: Case study of large scale investor-owned utilities in Florida," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 224-242.
    4. repec:eee:energy:v:141:y:2017:i:c:p:170-178 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Malik, Ihtisham Abdul & Siyal, Ghamz-e-Ali & Bin Abdullah, Alias & Alam, Arif & Zaman, Khalid & Kyophilavong, Phouphet & Shahbaz, Muhammad & Baloch, Siraj Ullah & Shams, Tauqeer, 2014. "Turn on the lights: Macroeconomic factors affecting renewable energy in Pakistan," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 277-284.
    6. Tiba, Sofien & Omri, Anis, 2017. "Literature survey on the relationships between energy, environment and economic growth," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 1129-1146.
    7. Akhmat, Ghulam & Zaman, Khalid & Shukui, Tan & Sajjad, Faiza, 2014. "Does energy consumption contribute to climate change? Evidence from major regions of the world," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 123-134.
    8. Muhammad Imran Qureshi & Usama Awan & Zeeshan Arshad & Amran Md. Rasli & Khalid Zaman & Faisal Khan, 2016. "Dynamic linkages among energy consumption, air pollution, greenhouse gas emissions and agricultural production in Pakistan: sustainable agriculture key to policy success," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 84(1), pages 367-381, October.
    9. repec:eee:enepol:v:113:y:2018:i:c:p:356-367 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Gralla, Fabienne & Abson, David J. & Møller, Anders P. & Lang, Daniel J. & von Wehrden, Henrik, 2017. "Energy transitions and national development indicators: A global review of nuclear energy production," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 1251-1265.
    11. repec:eee:rensus:v:74:y:2017:i:c:p:1119-1130 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. repec:eee:renene:v:114:y:2017:i:pb:p:638-643 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Balsalobre-Lorente, Daniel & Shahbaz, Muhammad & Roubaud, David & Farhani, Sahbi, 2018. "How economic growth, renewable electricity and natural resources contribute to CO2 emissions?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 356-367.
    14. Sofien, Tiba & Omri, Anis, 2016. "Literature survey on the relationships between energy variables, environment and economic growth," MPRA Paper 82555, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 14 Sep 2016.
    15. Gaigalis, Vygandas & Skema, Romualdas, 2015. "Analysis of the fuel and energy transition in Lithuanian industry and its sustainable development in 2005–2013 in compliance with the EU policy and strategy," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 265-279.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:rensus:v:25:y:2013:i:c:p:580-595. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/600126/description#description .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.