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Diffusion of renewable energy technologies—barriers and stakeholders’ perspectives

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  • Reddy, Sudhakar
  • Painuly, J.P

Abstract

This paper presents the results of a survey administered to households, personnel belonging to industry and commercial establishments, and policy experts with the objective of eliciting their views on the barriers to the diffusion of renewable energy technologies (RETs). Taking the Maharashtra State, India, as a case study, the paper develops a systematic classification of barriers to the adoption of RETs (economic, technological, market and institutional) and ranking them based on the perceptions of various stakeholders. The results provide evidence of how the consumers receive RET information and make decisions using their limited analytical capabilities. The analysis is used to enhance the knowledge by introducing ideas based on behavioural theory. Not only do these ideas help understanding the consumer perspective, they also help develop policy interventions. The aim is to define each barrier and describe its mode of influence that will help to develop policy measures for the removal of each barrier.

Suggested Citation

  • Reddy, Sudhakar & Painuly, J.P, 2004. "Diffusion of renewable energy technologies—barriers and stakeholders’ perspectives," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 29(9), pages 1431-1447.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:renene:v:29:y:2004:i:9:p:1431-1447
    DOI: 10.1016/j.renene.2003.12.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Johnson, Blake E., 1994. "Modeling energy technology choices : Which investment analysis tools are appropriate?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 22(10), pages 877-883, October.
    2. Kempton, Willett & Layne, Linda L., 1994. "The consumer's energy analysis environment," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 22(10), pages 857-866, October.
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