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Casinos, casino size, and crime: A panel data analysis of Michigan counties

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  • Falls, Gregory A.
  • Thompson, Philip B.

Abstract

Growth in legal gaming in the United States over the past quarter century or so is well-documented. One important factor fueling this growth was the passage of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988, which permitted Native American tribes to establish, under agreements or “compacts” with the states in which they are located, casinos offering what is known as Class III gaming: slot machines, blackjack, roulette, and other games. Since the passage of the Act, there have been 21 Native American casinos established in Michigan. Also, three non-Native American casinos opened in Detroit in 1999 and 2000. This growth in the number of casinos has sparked a wide-ranging debate over the social and economic impacts of casino development.

Suggested Citation

  • Falls, Gregory A. & Thompson, Philip B., 2014. "Casinos, casino size, and crime: A panel data analysis of Michigan counties," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 123-132.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:quaeco:v:54:y:2014:i:1:p:123-132
    DOI: 10.1016/j.qref.2013.10.006
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Casinos; Casino size; Property crime;

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