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Corruption, credit market imperfections, and economic development

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  • Antunes, Antonio R.
  • Cavalcanti, Tiago V.

Abstract

This paper studies the role of credit market imperfections and corruption on the process of economic development. We address the question of how much of the differences in output per capita across countries can be attributed to differences in credit market policies and corruption. In order to accomplish that, we construct and solve numerically a general equilibrium model with heterogeneous agents, contractual imperfections and occupational choices. The quantitative exercises suggest that a country in which debt contracts are not enforced and corruption corresponds to 10% of output will be roughly 1/3 to 1/2 as rich as the United States. Though this is an important effect, it is a small fraction of the huge differences in income per capita across countries.
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  • Antunes, Antonio R. & Cavalcanti, Tiago V., 2003. "Corruption, credit market imperfections, and economic development," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 43(4), pages 627-642.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:quaeco:v:43:y:2003:i:4:p:627-642
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    Cited by:

    1. Antunes, Antonio R. & Cavalcanti, Tiago V. de V., 2007. "Start up costs, limited enforcement, and the hidden economy," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 51(1), pages 203-224, January.
    2. Mirakhor, Abbas, 2007. "Islamic Finance and Globalization: A Convergence?," MPRA Paper 56026, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. repec:liu:liucej:v:14:y:2017:i:2:p:197-219 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Villamil, Anne P., 2003. "Introduction to capital accumulation and allocation in economic growth," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 43(4), pages 583-591.
    5. Vasilev, Aleksandar, 2017. "Business Cycle Accounting: Bulgaria after the introduction of the currency board arrangement (1999-2014)," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E6 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook
    • E64 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Incomes Policy; Price Policy

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