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Corporate name changes: Price reactions and long-run performance


  • Kot, Hung Wan


Stock price reactions and long-run performance after a corporate name change are investigated using a sample of Hong Kong listed companies spanning 1999 to 2008. Corporate name changes are classified into four types. Investors react positively around the announcement date to changes announced as being due to a merger or acquisition, a restructuring or a change in business type. Name changes to provide clarity or for reputational reasons generate no stock price reaction. No abnormal trading activity is detected around the announcement and in the post-event period. There is very weak evidence of a relationship between long-run abnormal stock returns, operating performance changes and corporate name changes. The results suggest that name changes have short-term stock price effects but no long-term relationship with stock price or operating performance.

Suggested Citation

  • Kot, Hung Wan, 2011. "Corporate name changes: Price reactions and long-run performance," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 230-244, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:pacfin:v:19:y:2011:i:2:p:230-244

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Dan Horsky & Patrick Swyngedouw, 1987. "Does it Pay to Change Your Company's Name? A Stock Market Perspective," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 6(4), pages 320-335.
    2. Michael J. Cooper, 2001. "A by Any Other Name," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 56(6), pages 2371-2388, December.
    3. Brown, Stephen J. & Warner, Jerold B., 1985. "Using daily stock returns : The case of event studies," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 3-31, March.
    4. Michael J. Cooper & Huseyin Gulen & P. Raghavendra Rau, 2005. "Changing Names with Style: Mutual Fund Name Changes and Their Effects on Fund Flows," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 60(6), pages 2825-2858, December.
    5. Wu, YiLin, 2010. "What's in a name? What leads a firm to change its name and what the new name foreshadows," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 1344-1359, June.
    6. Palani-Rajan Kadapakkam & Lalatendu Misra, 2007. "What'S In A Nickname? Price And Volume Effects Of A Pure Ticker Symbol Change," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 30(1), pages 53-71.
    7. Cooper, Michael J. & Khorana, Ajay & Osobov, Igor & Patel, Ajay & Rau, P. Raghavendra, 2005. "Managerial actions in response to a market downturn: valuation effects of name changes in the decline," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 11(1-2), pages 319-335, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gao, Fox & Faff, Robert & Navissi, Farshid, 2012. "Corporate philanthropy: Insights from the 2008 Wenchuan Earthquake in China," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 363-377.
    2. Kashmiri, Saim & Mahajan, Vijay, 2015. "The name's the game: Does marketing impact the value of corporate name changes?," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 281-290.


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