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Are magnet effects caused by uninformed traders? Evidence from Taiwan Stock Exchange

  • Wong, Woon K.
  • Chang, Matthew C.
  • Tu, Anthony H.

Using transactions and quotes data, we find significant magnet effects of price limit rules in Taiwan Stock Exchange (TSEC). Consistent with Subrahmanyam [Subrahmanyam, A., 1994. Circuit breakers and market volatility: a theoretical perspective. Journal of Finance 49, 237-254], we find that when limit hits are imminent, trading activities intensify with higher volume and volatility. More importantly, our transactions data allows us to examine the roles of institutions and individuals in the magnet effects in TSEC. There is strong evidence that magnet effects are caused by uninformed individuals, whereas if trade volumes are dominated by institutions, no significant magnet effect is found. The policy implication of our findings is that transparency and institutional participation can help to reduce the frequency of magnet effects.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Pacific-Basin Finance Journal.

Volume (Year): 17 (2009)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 28-40

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Handle: RePEc:eee:pacfin:v:17:y:2009:i:1:p:28-40
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/pacfin

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  1. Kim, Kenneth & Rhee, S Ghon, 1997. " Price Limit Performance: Evidence from the Tokyo Stock Exchange," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 52(2), pages 885-99, June.
  2. White, Halbert, 1980. "A Heteroskedasticity-Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimator and a Direct Test for Heteroskedasticity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(4), pages 817-38, May.
  3. Lehmann, B.N., 1989. "Commentary: Volatility, Price Resolution, And The Effectiveness Of Price Limits," Papers t9, Columbia - Center for Futures Markets.
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  7. Marcelo Fernandes & Marco Aur�lio dos Santos Rocha, 2006. "Are Price Limits on Futures Markets That Cool? Evidence from the Brazilian Mercantile and Futures Exchange," Working Papers 579, Queen Mary University of London, School of Economics and Finance.
  8. Chan, Louis K C & Lakonishok, Josef, 1995. " The Behavior of Stock Prices around Institutional Trades," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 50(4), pages 1147-74, September.
  9. Lee, Charles M C & Ready, Mark J & Seguin, Paul J, 1994. " Volume, Volatility, and New York Stock Exchange Trading Halts," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 49(1), pages 183-214, March.
  10. Chakravarty, Sugato, 2001. "Stealth-trading: Which traders' trades move stock prices?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(2), pages 289-307, August.
  11. Goldstein, Michael A. & Kavajecz, Kenneth A., 2004. "Trading strategies during circuit breakers and extreme market movements," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 7(3), pages 301-333, June.
  12. Marcelle Arak & Richard Cook, 1997. "Do Daily Price Limits Act as Magnets? The Case of Treasury Bond Futures," Journal of Financial Services Research, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 5-20, August.
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  14. Hasbrouck, Joel, 1991. "The Summary Informativeness of Stock Trades: An Econometric Analysis," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 4(3), pages 571-95.
  15. Kim, Kenneth A., 2001. "Price limits and stock market volatility," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 71(1), pages 131-136, April.
  16. Subrahmanyam, Avanidhar, 1994. " Circuit Breakers and Market Volatility: A Theoretical Perspective," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 49(1), pages 237-54, March.
  17. Madhavan, Ananth, 2000. "Market microstructure: A survey," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 3(3), pages 205-258, August.
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