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The source of fluctuations in money : Evidence from trade credit

  • Ramey, Valerie A.

This paper tests the importance of technology shocks versus financial shocks for explaining, fluctuations in money. The model presented extends the theory of King and Plosser by recognizing that both money and trade credit provide transactions services. The model shows that the comovements between money and trade credit can reveal the nature of the underlying shocks. The empirical results strongly suggest that shocks to the financial system account for most of the fluctuations in money. Thus, the results cast doubt on the hypothesis that nonfinancial technology shocks are the main source of the money-income correlation.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Monetary Economics.

Volume (Year): 30 (1992)
Issue (Month): 2 (November)
Pages: 171-193

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Handle: RePEc:eee:moneco:v:30:y:1992:i:2:p:171-193
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505566

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  1. Lacker, Jeffrey M., 1990. "Inside money and real output: A reinterpretation," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 12(1), pages 65-79.
  2. Engle, R.F. & Yoo, B.S., 1989. "Cointegrated Economic Time Series: A Survey With New Results," Papers 8-89-13, Pennsylvania State - Department of Economics.
  3. Robert B. Litterman & Laurence Weiss, 1983. "Money, Real Interest Rates, and Output: A Reinterpretation of Postwar U.S. Data," NBER Working Papers 1077, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Milbourne, Ross D, 1983. "Credit Flows and the Money Supply," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 22(41), pages 418-30, December.
  5. John H. Cochrane, 1990. "Univariate vs. Multivariate Forecasts of GNP Growth and Stock Returns: Evidence and Implications for the Persistence of Shocks, Detrending Methods," NBER Working Papers 3427, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Boschen, John F. & Mills, Leonard O., 1988. "Tests of the relation between money and output in the real business cycle model," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 355-374.
  7. Greenwald, Bruce & Stiglitz, Joseph E & Weiss, Andrew, 1984. "Informational Imperfections in the Capital Market and Macroeconomic Fluctuations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 74(2), pages 194-99, May.
  8. Besley, Scott & Osteryoung, Jerome S, 1985. "Survey of Current Practices in Establishing Trade-Credit Limits," The Financial Review, Eastern Finance Association, vol. 20(1), pages 70-82, February.
  9. Nelson, Charles R. & Plosser, Charles I., 1982. "Trends and random walks in macroeconmic time series : Some evidence and implications," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 139-162.
  10. Martin S. Eichenbaum & Kenneth J. Singleton, 1986. "Do Equilibrium Real Business Cycle Theories Explain Post-War U.S. Business Cycles?," NBER Working Papers 1932, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Nadiri, M Ishaq, 1969. "The Determinants of Trade Credit in the U.S. Total Manufacturing Sector," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 37(3), pages 408-23, July.
  12. Ferris, J Stephen, 1981. "A Transactions Theory of Trade Credit Use," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 96(2), pages 243-70, May.
  13. Engle, Robert F & Granger, Clive W J, 1987. "Co-integration and Error Correction: Representation, Estimation, and Testing," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 55(2), pages 251-76, March.
  14. Charles I. Plosser, 1990. "Money and Business Cycles: A Real Business Cycle Interpretation," NBER Working Papers 3221, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Ben S. Bernanke, 1986. "Alternative Explanations of the Money-Income Correlation," NBER Working Papers 1842, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  16. Otto Eckstein & Allen Sinai, 1986. "The Mechanisms of the Business Cycle in the Postwar Era," NBER Chapters, in: The American Business Cycle: Continuity and Change, pages 39-122 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  17. McCallum, Bennett T, 1986. "On "Real' and "Sticky-Price' Theories of the Business Cycle," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 18(4), pages 397-414, November.
  18. Sims, Christopher A, 1980. "Macroeconomics and Reality," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(1), pages 1-48, January.
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