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A random utility maximization (RUM) based measure of accessibility to transit: Accurate capturing of the first-mile issue in urban transit

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  • Hasnine, Md Sami
  • Graovac, Ana
  • Camargo, Felipe
  • Habib, Khandker Nurul

Abstract

The paper presents a random utility-based measure of accessibility to explain the first-mile issue in urban transit. A discrete access stop/station location choice model is used to calculate the expected maximum utility of transit access choices as the measure of the proposed access to transit measurement approach. It captures the effects of changes in various personal, sociodemographic, transportation and land-use variables on access to urban transit that are overlooked by conventional approaches of accessibility measurements (count-based cumulative opportunities measures and gravity-based measures). The proposed accessibility to transit measurement approach is empirically measured for the Greater Toronto Area and is integrated into an operational tool programmed in a GIS-based traffic assignment software, TransCAD 7.0. This allows comparing it to the conventional measures, and the results reveal that the conventional measures tend to over-estimate access to transit.

Suggested Citation

  • Hasnine, Md Sami & Graovac, Ana & Camargo, Felipe & Habib, Khandker Nurul, 2019. "A random utility maximization (RUM) based measure of accessibility to transit: Accurate capturing of the first-mile issue in urban transit," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 313-320.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jotrge:v:74:y:2019:i:c:p:313-320
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jtrangeo.2018.12.007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

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    3. Huijun Sun & Si Zhang & Linghui Han & Xiaomei Zhao & Lu Lou, 2020. "Day-to-Day Evolution Model Based on Dynamic Reference Point with Heterogeneous Travelers," Networks and Spatial Economics, Springer, vol. 20(4), pages 935-961, December.

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