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Relational accommodation in negotiation: Effects of egalitarianism and gender on economic efficiency and relational capital

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  • Curhan, Jared R.
  • Neale, Margaret A.
  • Ross, Lee
  • Rosencranz-Engelmann, Jesse

Abstract

Highly relational contexts can have costs as well as benefits. Researchers theorize that negotiating dyads in which both parties hold highly relational goals or views of themselves are prone to relational accommodation, a dynamic resulting in inefficient economic outcomes yet high levels of relational capital. Previous research has provided only indirect empirical support for this theory. The present study fills this gap by demonstrating the divergent effects of egalitarianism on economic efficiency and relational capital in negotiation. Dyads engaged in a simulated employment negotiation among strangers within a company that was described as either egalitarian or hierarchical. As hypothesized, dyads assigned to the egalitarian condition reached less efficient economic outcomes yet had higher relational capital than dyads assigned to the hierarchical condition. Negotiations occurring between females resulted in lower joint economic outcomes than negotiations occurring between males. Results are consistent with the theory of relational self-construal in negotiation.

Suggested Citation

  • Curhan, Jared R. & Neale, Margaret A. & Ross, Lee & Rosencranz-Engelmann, Jesse, 2008. "Relational accommodation in negotiation: Effects of egalitarianism and gender on economic efficiency and relational capital," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 107(2), pages 192-205, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jobhdp:v:107:y:2008:i:2:p:192-205
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. De Clercq, Dirk & Sapienza, Harry J., 2006. "Effects of relational capital and commitment on venture capitalists' perception of portfolio company performance," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 326-347, May.
    2. Pinkley, Robin L. & Neale, Margaret A. & Bennett, Rebecca J., 1994. "The Impact of Alternatives to Settlement in Dyadic Negotiation," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 57(1), pages 97-116, January.
    3. Tinsley, Catherine H. & Brett, Jeanne M., 2001. "Managing Workplace Conflict in the United States and Hong Kong," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 85(2), pages 360-381, July.
    4. Johnson, Russell E. & Selenta, Christopher & Lord, Robert G., 2006. "When organizational justice and the self-concept meet: Consequences for the organization and its members," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 99(2), pages 175-201, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kennedy, Jessica A. & Kray, Laura J. & Ku, Gillian, 2017. "A social-cognitive approach to understanding gender differences in negotiator ethics: The role of moral identity," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 138(C), pages 28-44.
    2. Shirako, Aiwa & Kilduff, Gavin J. & Kray, Laura J., 2015. "Is there a place for sympathy in negotiation? Finding strength in weakness," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 131(C), pages 95-109.
    3. Miles, Edward W. & Clenney, Elizabeth F., 2012. "Extremely difficult negotiator goals: Do they follow the predictions of goal-setting theory?," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 118(2), pages 108-115.
    4. Pettit, Nathan C. & Doyle, Sarah P. & Lount, Robert B. & To, Christopher, 2016. "Cheating to get ahead or to avoid falling behind? The effect of potential negative versus positive status change on unethical behavior," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 137(C), pages 172-183.

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