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Growth and welfare effects of stabilizing innovation cycles

  • Aloi, Marta
  • Lasselle, Laurence

We consider a simple model of innovation where equilibrium cycles may arise and show that, whenever actual capital accumulation falls below its balanced growth path, subsidizing innovators by taxing consumers has stabilizing effects, promotes sustained growth and increases welfare. Further, if the steady state is unstable under laissez faire, the introduction of the subsidy can make the steady state stable. Such a policy has beneficial effects as it fosters output growth along the transitional adjustment path, and increases the welfare of current and future generations.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Macroeconomics.

Volume (Year): 29 (2007)
Issue (Month): 4 (December)
Pages: 806-823

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jmacro:v:29:y:2007:i:4:p:806-823
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/622617

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