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How does a devaluation affect the current account?

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  • Devereux, M. B.

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  • Devereux, M. B., 2000. "How does a devaluation affect the current account?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 19(6), pages 833-851, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jimfin:v:19:y:2000:i:6:p:833-851
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Obstfeld, Maurice & Rogoff, Kenneth, 1995. "Exchange Rate Dynamics Redux," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(3), pages 624-660, June.
    2. Engel, Charles, 1993. "Real exchange rates and relative prices : An empirical investigation," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 35-50, August.
    3. Charles Engel, 1999. "Accounting for U.S. Real Exchange Rate Changes," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(3), pages 507-538, June.
    4. Engel, Charles & Rogers, John H, 1996. "How Wide Is the Border?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(5), pages 1112-1125, December.
    5. Pinelopi Koujianou Goldberg & Michael M. Knetter, 1997. "Goods Prices and Exchange Rates: What Have We Learned?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 35(3), pages 1243-1272, September.
    6. Marston, Richard C., 1990. "Pricing to market in Japanese manufacturing," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(3-4), pages 217-236, November.
    7. Avinash Dixit, 1989. "Hysteresis, Import Penetration, and Exchange Rate Pass-Through," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 104(2), pages 205-228.
    8. Froot, Kenneth A & Klemperer, Paul D, 1989. "Exchange Rate Pass-Through When Market Share Matters," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(4), pages 637-654, September.
    9. Giovanni Lombardo, "undated". "On the trade balance response to monetary shocks: the Marshall-Lerner conditions reconsidered," Discussion Papers 98/5, Department of Economics, University of York.
    10. Betts, Caroline & Devereux, Michael B., 2000. "Exchange rate dynamics in a model of pricing-to-market," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 215-244, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Min Lu, 2012. "Current account dynamics and optimal monetary policy in a two-country economy," International Journal of Monetary Economics and Finance, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 5(3), pages 299-324.
    2. repec:eee:ecmode:v:69:y:2018:i:c:p:82-90 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Jin, Hailong & Choi, Yoonho & Kwan Choi, E., 2016. "Unemployment and optimal currency intervention in an open economy," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 253-261.
    4. Dennis Novy, 2010. "Trade Costs and the Open Macroeconomy," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 112(3), pages 514-545, September.
    5. Maurice Larrain, 2003. "Central bank intervention, the current account, and exchange rates," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 9(3), pages 196-205, August.
    6. Massimo Giuliodori, "undated". "The Empirical Relevance of a basic sticky-price intertemporal model," Working Papers 2001_17, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow.
    7. Caroline Schmidt, 2006. "International transmission effects of monetary policy shocks: can asymmetric price setting explain the stylized facts?," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(3), pages 205-218.
    8. Cedric Tille, 2000. ""Beggar-thy-neighbor" or "beggar-thyself"? the income effect of exchange rate fluctuations," Staff Reports 112, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    9. Mohsen Bahmani-Oskooee & Yomgqing Wang, 2007. "The J-Curve At The Industry Level: Evidence From Trade Between The Us And Australia ," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(4), pages 315-328, December.
    10. repec:kap:iaecre:v:9:y:2003:i:3:p:196-205 is not listed on IDEAS

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