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Can technology really help to reduce underage drinking? New evidence on the effects of false ID laws with scanner provisions

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  • Zheng, Emily Yiying

Abstract

In Volume 36 of this journal, Yoruk (2014) uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 and finds that false ID laws with scanner provisions have large impacts on binge drinking participation, frequency of alcohol consumption and binge drinking frequency among minors. This paper reexamines how false ID laws with scanner provisions affect underage drinking. I first demonstrate that analyses based on NLSY97 data fail falsification exercises testing for significant pre-intervention effects, and that the estimated effects based on these data are highly sensitive to the inclusion of a lead term and to sample selection, which weakens confidence in the large estimated effects reported in Yoruk (2014). I then use data from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System to show that false ID laws with scanner provisions have no effect on underage drinking behavior.

Suggested Citation

  • Zheng, Emily Yiying, 2018. "Can technology really help to reduce underage drinking? New evidence on the effects of false ID laws with scanner provisions," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 102-112.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:57:y:2018:i:c:p:102-112
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2017.10.009
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Underage drinking; False ID laws with scanner provisions;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

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