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Assessing household food insecurity experience in the context of deforestation in Cameroon

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  • Tata Ngome, Precillia I.
  • Shackleton, Charlie
  • Degrande, Ann
  • Nossi, Eric Joel
  • Ngome, Francis

Abstract

In forest areas, reconciling strategies to halt deforestation and concerns to improve sustainable food supply and access is a great challenge to development planners and forest managers. This paper gathered evidence on the relationship between deforestation and food insecurity. The study was executed in Cameroon’s forest areas which constitute 10% of the Congo basin forest - an area characterized by increasing deforestation and high levels of poverty and food insecurity (FIS). The objective was to understand the characteristics, prevalence and severity of household FIS as deforestation increases. The HFIAS 9-item questionnaire for measuring experience-based FIS was used for data collection and analysis.

Suggested Citation

  • Tata Ngome, Precillia I. & Shackleton, Charlie & Degrande, Ann & Nossi, Eric Joel & Ngome, Francis, 2019. "Assessing household food insecurity experience in the context of deforestation in Cameroon," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 57-65.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:84:y:2019:i:c:p:57-65
    DOI: 10.1016/j.foodpol.2019.02.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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