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Functional ingredients and food choice: Results from a dual-mode study employing means-end-chain analysis and a choice experiment


  • Bitzios, Michael
  • Fraser, Iain
  • Haddock-Fraser, Janet


In this paper we present the results of a choice experiment (CE) conducted to examine how the inclusion of a functional ingredient (to increase the quantity and effectiveness of fibre) affects consumer attitudes towards bread. An novel feature of the design of our CE was that it was informed by a means-end-chain (MEC) to reveal key attributes to be included in the CE. In addition, we included the Dutch eating behaviour questionnaire (DEBQ) to collect information on all participants underlying eating behaviours. We find that bread type is a major factor in determining choice, and that the inclusion of a functional ingredient yielded relatively small measures of value. We also find that there are differences in willingness-to-pay (WTP) between respondent segments and that segment membership is explained by the DEBQ information. Finally, we find that respondents have a stronger preference for a simple health statement compared to, or in addition to, the implied benefits that result from consuming a functional food product. These findings are important in informing both pricing and promotional messages for a functional bread product.

Suggested Citation

  • Bitzios, Michael & Fraser, Iain & Haddock-Fraser, Janet, 2011. "Functional ingredients and food choice: Results from a dual-mode study employing means-end-chain analysis and a choice experiment," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 714-724, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:36:y:2011:i:5:p:714-724

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Beghin, John C. & Jensen, Helen H., 2008. "Farm policies and added sugars in US diets," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 480-488, December.
    2. Alston, Julian M. & Sumner, Daniel A. & Vosti, Stephen A., 2008. "Farm subsidies and obesity in the United States: National evidence and international comparisons," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 470-479, December.
    3. Ghosh, Koel & Senauer, Benjamin, 2009. "Adequacy of Federal School Lunch Reimbursement Adjustments," Choices, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 24(3).
    4. Cora Peterson, 2009. "A comparative cost analysis of commodity foods from the U.S. Department of Agriculture in the National School Lunch Program," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(4), pages 626-654.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kelvin Balcombe & Michail Bitzios & Iain Fraser & Janet Haddock-Fraser, 2014. "Using Attribute Importance Rankings Within Discrete Choice Experiments: An Application to Valuing Bread Attributes," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 65(2), pages 446-462, June.
    2. Glenk, Klaus & Hall, Clare & Liebe, Ulf & Meyerhoff, Jürgen, 2012. "Preferences of Scotch malt whisky consumers for changes in pesticide use and origin of barley," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 719-731.
    3. Hellyer, Nicole Elizabeth & Fraser, Iain & Haddock-Fraser, Janet, 2012. "Food choice, health information and functional ingredients: An experimental auction employing bread," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 232-245.
    4. Santeramo, Fabio Gaetano & Carlucci, Domenico & De Devitiis, Biagia & Seccia, Antonio & Stasi, Antonio & Viscecchia, Rosaria & Nardone, Gianluca, 2017. "Emerging trends in European food, diets and food industry," MPRA Paper 82105, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Staudigel, Matthias & Anders, Sven, 2016. "Does taste trump health? Effects of nutritional characteristics on brand-level demand for chips in the U.S," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235755, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    6. Bechtold, Kai-Brit & Abdulai, Awudu, 2013. "Combining Likert scale attitudinal statements with choice experiments to analyze pref-erence heterogeneity for functional dairy products," 87th Annual Conference, April 8-10, 2013, Warwick University, Coventry, UK 158851, Agricultural Economics Society.
    7. Staudigel, Matthias & Anders, Sven, 2016. "Does Taste Trump Health? – The Effect Of Nutrient Profiles On Brand-Level Demand For Chips In The U.S," 56th Annual Conference, Bonn, Germany, September 28-30, 2016 244760, German Association of Agricultural Economists (GEWISOLA).


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