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Sustaining linkages to high value markets through collective action in Uganda

Author

Listed:
  • Kaganzi, Elly
  • Ferris, Shaun
  • Barham, James
  • Abenakyo, Annet
  • Sanginga, Pascal
  • Njuki, Jemimah

Abstract

Uganda's rapid urbanization offers new market opportunities for smallholder farmers to supply higher value markets such as supermarket chains and fast-food restaurants. Supplying these formal outlets offers higher incomes but accessing and maintaining links to these markets requires significant upgrading in terms of product quality and business management. To meet these conditions farmers need to become more organized which requires increased levels of social capital, to strengthen internal and external relations with group members, service providers and market chain actors. One farmers' group in south-western Uganda has successfully sustained sales of potatoes to a fast-food outlet in Kampala. Farmers had to learn a series of new skills and integrate multiple technical, organizational, financial and marketing innovations. This paper outlines how collective action combined with strong leadership and an iterative market-led learning process enabled a smallholder farmers' association to meet the considerable challenges of achieving the stringent quality parameters of a modern food outlet.

Suggested Citation

  • Kaganzi, Elly & Ferris, Shaun & Barham, James & Abenakyo, Annet & Sanginga, Pascal & Njuki, Jemimah, 2009. "Sustaining linkages to high value markets through collective action in Uganda," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 23-30, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:34:y:2009:i:1:p:23-30
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Agrawal, Arun, 2001. "Common Property Institutions and Sustainable Governance of Resources," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(10), pages 1649-1672, October.
    2. Meinzen-Dick, Ruth & Raju, K. V. & Gulati, Ashok, 2002. "What Affects Organization and Collective Action for Managing Resources? Evidence from Canal Irrigation Systems in India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 649-666, April.
    3. Jones, Eric C., 2004. "Wealth-Based Trust and the Development of Collective Action," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 691-711, April.
    4. Thomas Reardon & C. Peter Timmer & Christopher B. Barrett & Julio Berdegué, 2003. "The Rise of Supermarkets in Africa, Asia, and Latin America," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1140-1146.
    5. Johnson, Nancy & Suarez , Ruth & Lundy, Mark, 2002. "The importance of social capital in Colombian rural agro-enterprises:," CAPRi working papers 26, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Godtland, Erin M & Sadoulet, Elisabeth & De Janvry, Alain & Murgai, Rinku & Ortiz, Oscar, 2004. "The Impact of Farmer Field Schools on Knowledge and Productivity: A Study of Potato Farmers in the Peruvian Andes," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 53(1), pages 63-92, October.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ortiz, Oscar & Orrego, Ricardo & Pradel, Willy & Gildemacher, Peter & Castillo, Renee & Otiniano, Ronal & Gabriel, Julio & Vallejo, Juan & Torres, Omar & Woldegiorgis, Gemebredin & Damene, Belew & Kak, 2013. "Insights into potato innovation systems in Bolivia, Ethiopia, Peru and Uganda," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 114(C), pages 73-83.
    2. Mensah, Edouard R. & Karantininis, Kostas & Adegbidi, Anselme & Okello, Julius Juma, 2012. "Determinants of Commitment to Agricultural Cooperatives: Cashew Nuts Farmers in Benin," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 125946, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. Lowitt, Kristen & Hickey, Gordon M. & Ganpat, Wayne & Phillip, Leroy, 2015. "Linking Communities of Practice with Value Chain Development in Smallholder Farming Systems," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 74(C), pages 363-373.
    4. Rao, Elizaphan J.O. & Qaim, Matin, 2011. "Supermarkets, Farm Household Income, and Poverty: Insights from Kenya," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(5), pages 784-796, May.
    5. Luna, Fátima & Wilson, Paul N., 2015. "An Economic Exploration of Smallholder Value Chains: Coffee Transactions in Chiapas, Mexico," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IFAMA), vol. 0(Issue 3), pages 1-22, September.
    6. Trebbin, Anika, 2014. "Linking small farmers to modern retail through producer organizations – Experiences with producer companies in India," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 35-44.
    7. Stür, Werner & Khanh, Truong Tan & Duncan, Alan, 2016. "Transformation of smallholder beef-cattle production in Vietnam," IFPRI book chapters,in: Innovation for inclusive value-chain development: Successes and challenges, chapter 6, pages 201-228 International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. repec:spr:endesu:v:19:y:2017:i:6:d:10.1007_s10668-016-9863-y is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Christina Handschuch & Meike Wollni, 2013. "Traditional food crop marketing in Sub-Saharan Africa: Does gender matter?," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 142, Courant Research Centre PEG.

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