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Sustaining linkages to high value markets through collective action in Uganda

  • Kaganzi, Elly
  • Ferris, Shaun
  • Barham, James
  • Abenakyo, Annet
  • Sanginga, Pascal
  • Njuki, Jemimah
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    Uganda's rapid urbanization offers new market opportunities for smallholder farmers to supply higher value markets such as supermarket chains and fast-food restaurants. Supplying these formal outlets offers higher incomes but accessing and maintaining links to these markets requires significant upgrading in terms of product quality and business management. To meet these conditions farmers need to become more organized which requires increased levels of social capital, to strengthen internal and external relations with group members, service providers and market chain actors. One farmers' group in south-western Uganda has successfully sustained sales of potatoes to a fast-food outlet in Kampala. Farmers had to learn a series of new skills and integrate multiple technical, organizational, financial and marketing innovations. This paper outlines how collective action combined with strong leadership and an iterative market-led learning process enabled a smallholder farmers' association to meet the considerable challenges of achieving the stringent quality parameters of a modern food outlet.

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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Food Policy.

    Volume (Year): 34 (2009)
    Issue (Month): 1 (February)
    Pages: 23-30

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:34:y:2009:i:1:p:23-30
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/foodpol

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    1. Thomas Reardon & C. Peter Timmer & Christopher B. Barrett & Julio Berdegué, 2003. "The Rise of Supermarkets in Africa, Asia, and Latin America," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1140-1146.
    2. Godtland, Erin & Sadoulet, Elisabeth & de Janvry, Alain & Murgai, Rinku & Ortiz, Oscar, 2003. "The Impact of Farmer-Field-Schools on Knowledge and Productivity: A Study of Potato Farmers in the Peruvian Andes," Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics, UC Berkeley, Working Paper Series qt8hp835xx, Department of Agricultural & Resource Economics, UC Berkeley.
    3. Jones, Eric C., 2004. "Wealth-Based Trust and the Development of Collective Action," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 691-711, April.
    4. Johnson, Nancy & Suarez , Ruth & Lundy, Mark, 2002. "The importance of social capital in Colombian rural agro-enterprises:," CAPRi working papers 26, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Agrawal, Arun, 2001. "Common Property Institutions and Sustainable Governance of Resources," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(10), pages 1649-1672, October.
    6. Meinzen-Dick, Ruth & Raju, K. V. & Gulati, Ashok, 2002. "What Affects Organization and Collective Action for Managing Resources? Evidence from Canal Irrigation Systems in India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 649-666, April.
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