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Public-private alliances in biotechnology: Can they narrow the knowledge gaps between rich and poor?

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  • Rausser, Gordon
  • Simon, Leo
  • Ameden, Holly

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  • Rausser, Gordon & Simon, Leo & Ameden, Holly, 2000. "Public-private alliances in biotechnology: Can they narrow the knowledge gaps between rich and poor?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 499-513, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jfpoli:v:25:y:2000:i:4:p:499-513
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David J. TEECE, 2008. "Profiting from technological innovation: Implications for integration, collaboration, licensing and public policy," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: The Transfer And Licensing Of Know-How And Intellectual Property Understanding the Multinational Enterprise in the Modern World, chapter 5, pages 67-87 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    2. Barry, Peter J. & Alson, Julian & Gardner, Bruce L. & Irwin, Tracy & Huffman, Wallace E. & Norton, George W. & Phillips, Michael J., 1997. "Rates of Return to Public Investment in Agricultural Research and Education," Choices, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 12(4).
    3. Lee, D. & Rausser, Gordon C., 1992. "The Structure of Research and Transfer Policies in International Agriculture: Evidence and Implications," Staff General Research Papers Archive 717, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    4. Richard E. Just & Gordon C. Rausser, 1993. "The Governance Structure of Agricultural Science and Agricultural Economics: A Call to Arms," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 75(Special_I), pages 69-83.
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    Cited by:

    1. Krishna, Vijesh V. & Qaim, Matin, 2007. "Estimating the adoption of Bt eggplant in India: Who Benefits from public-private partnership?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(5-6), pages 523-543.
    2. Kremer, Michael & Zwane, Alix Peterson, 2005. "Encouraging Private Sector Research for Tropical Agriculture," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 87-105, January.
    3. Byerlee, Derek & Fischer, Ken, 2002. "Accessing Modern Science: Policy and Institutional Options for Agricultural Biotechnology in Developing Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 931-948, June.
    4. Tripp, Robert, 2002. "Can the public sector meet the challenge of private research? Commentary on "Falcon and Fowler" and "Pingali and Traxler"," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 239-246, June.
    5. Martinez-Poveda, Africa & Molla-Bauza, Margarita Brugarolas & del Campo Gomis, Francisco Jose & Martinez, Laura Martinez-Carrasco, 2009. "Consumer-perceived risk model for the introduction of genetically modified food in Spain," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 519-528, December.
    6. Spielman,David J. & Hartwich,Frank & von Grebmer, Klaus, 2007. "Sharing science, building bridges, and enhancing impact: Public-Private Partnerships in the CGIAR," IFPRI discussion papers 708, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Spielman, David J., 2007. "Pro-poor agricultural biotechnology: Can the international research system deliver the goods?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 189-204, April.
    8. Tiffany Shih & Brian Wright, 2011. "Agricultural Innovation," NBER Chapters,in: Accelerating Energy Innovation: Insights from Multiple Sectors, pages 49-85 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Pardey, Philip G. & James, Jennifer S. & Alston, Julian M. & Wood, Stanley & Koo, Bonwoo & Binenbaum, Eran & Hurley, Terrance M. & Glewwe, Paul & Mayer, Jorge & Jones, Richard & De Groote, Hugo & Kana, 2007. "Science, Technology and Skills," Reports 136256, University of Minnesota, International Science and Technology Practice and Policy.
    10. Joanna Chataway, 2005. "Introduction: is it possible to create pro-poor agriculture-related biotechnology?," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(5), pages 597-610.

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