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Behavioral biases in endogenous-timing herding games: An experimental study

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  • Ivanov, Asen
  • Levin, Dan
  • Peck, James

Abstract

We experimentally study behavior in an endogenous-timing herding game. We find that subjects respond to their type and to observed investment activity in a sensible way, but there are also substantial departures from Nash Equilibrium. Some departures can be viewed as mere noise in decision making while other departures represent systematic biases reflecting subjects’ failure to appreciate subtle aspects of the game.

Suggested Citation

  • Ivanov, Asen & Levin, Dan & Peck, James, 2013. "Behavioral biases in endogenous-timing herding games: An experimental study," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 25-34.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jeborg:v:87:y:2013:i:c:p:25-34
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jebo.2012.12.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Meub, Lukas & Proeger, Till & Hüning, Hendrik, 2013. "A comparison of endogenous and exogenous timing in a social learning experiment," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 167, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    2. repec:spr:jeicoo:v:12:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s11403-015-0156-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Dan Levin & James Peck & Asen Ivanov, 2016. "Separating Bayesian Updating from Non-Probabilistic Reasoning: An Experimental Investigation," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 8(2), pages 39-60, May.
    4. Brindisi, Francesco & Çelen, Boğaçhan & Hyndman, Kyle, 2014. "The effect of endogenous timing on coordination under asymmetric information: An experimental study," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 264-281.
    5. Jones, Matthew T., 2014. "Strategic complexity and cooperation: An experimental study," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 352-366.

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