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Childhood socioeconomic status does not explain the IQ-mortality gradient

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  • Bratsberg, Bernt
  • Rogeberg, Ole

Abstract

Cognitive ability correlates with mortality risk, but confounding from childhood social class has been a persistent concern. While studies controlling for indicators of childhood social status report limited attenuation of coefficients, important parental and family factors are likely to vary substantially within social class.

Suggested Citation

  • Bratsberg, Bernt & Rogeberg, Ole, 2017. "Childhood socioeconomic status does not explain the IQ-mortality gradient," Intelligence, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 148-154.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:intell:v:62:y:2017:i:c:p:148-154
    DOI: 10.1016/j.intell.2017.04.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Joshua D. Angrist & Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 2009. "Mostly Harmless Econometrics: An Empiricist's Companion," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 8769, April.
    2. Elizabeth U. Cascio & Ethan G. Lewis, 2006. "Schooling and the Armed Forces Qualifying Test: Evidence from School-Entry Laws," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 41(2).
    3. Kuh, Diana & Shah, Imran & Richards, Marcus & Mishra, Gita & Wadsworth, Michael & Hardy, Rebecca, 2009. "Do childhood cognitive ability or smoking behaviour explain the influence of lifetime socio-economic conditions on premature adult mortality in a British post war birth cohort?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 68(9), pages 1565-1573, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lynn, Richard & Fuerst, John & Kirkegaard, Emil O.W., 2018. "Regional Differences in Intelligence in 22 Countries and their Economic, Social and Demographic Correlates: A Review," Intelligence, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 24-36.

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