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Enrolment ratios and related puzzles in developing countries: Approaches for interrogating the data drawing from the case of South Africa

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  • Gustafsson, Martin

Abstract

Available developing country enrolment ratios are frequently inaccurate. This results in poorly informed policy discourses. Underlying data problems can undermine funding systems. The magnitude of the problem is described, partly through reference to UNESCO and UNICEF ratios. Steps for remedying the situation within one country are proposed, on the basis of an existing South African study, and some new data analysis of South African, Brazilian, and international data. Remedies must be sensitive to local contexts, but proposed techniques for detecting fraud in the enrolment microdata, and comparing age structures across different datasets, seem relevant for different contexts.

Suggested Citation

  • Gustafsson, Martin, 2015. "Enrolment ratios and related puzzles in developing countries: Approaches for interrogating the data drawing from the case of South Africa," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 63-72.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:injoed:v:42:y:2015:i:c:p:63-72
    DOI: 10.1016/j.ijedudev.2015.03.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Martin Gustafsson, 2012. "The gap between school enrolments and population in South Africa: Analysis of the possible explanations," Working Papers 23/2012, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    2. Mikael Lindahl & Alan B. Krueger, 2001. "Education for Growth: Why and for Whom?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(4), pages 1101-1136, December.
    3. Lant Pritchett & Michael Woolcock & Matt Andrews, 2013. "Looking Like a State: Techniques of Persistent Failure in State Capability for Implementation," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(1), pages 1-18, January.
    4. repec:unu:wpaper:wp2012-63 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Martin Gustafsson, 2016. "Teacher supply and the quality of schooling in South Africa. Patterns over space and time," Working Papers 03/2016, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    2. Chris van Wyk, 2015. "An overview of Education data in South Africa: an inventory approach," Working Papers 19/2015, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    3. Martin Gustafsson & Carol Nuga Deliwe, 2017. "Rotten apples or just apples and pears? Understanding patterns consistent with cheating in international test data," Working Papers 17/2017, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.

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