IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/hepoli/v120y2016i2p198-204.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The contribution of locational factors to regional variations in office-based physicians in Germany

Author

Listed:
  • Vogt, Verena

Abstract

There is considerable literature showing that regional variation in the number of office-based physicians is rather explained by factors such as financial attractiveness of a region or employment opportunities for spouses than by health care needs of the population. It remains unclear, however, how much of the variation is explained by each of these determinants. The aim of the present study is to estimate the percentage contribution of a variety of determinants to the measured variation in Germany. Physician density is regressed on a well-defined set of explanatory variables that were identified as determinants of physician location. Regression-based decomposition was applied to decompose the variation in physician density into the percentage contribution of each of the determinants. The results show that varying health care needs of the population explained less than 5.2% of the variation in physician density. Percentage of population with private health insurance explained 14% of the variation in GP density and between 2% and 6% of the variation in specialists’ density. For specialists, a higher share of variance was attributable to the variables measuring sociocultural amenities of a region compared to GPs.

Suggested Citation

  • Vogt, Verena, 2016. "The contribution of locational factors to regional variations in office-based physicians in Germany," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 120(2), pages 198-204.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:hepoli:v:120:y:2016:i:2:p:198-204 DOI: 10.1016/j.healthpol.2016.01.006
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168851016000208
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hingstman, L. & Boon, H., 1989. "Regional dispersion of independent professionals in primary health care in the Netherlands," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 121-129, January.
    2. Busch, Lawrence & Dale, Christopher, 1978. "The changing distribution of physicians," Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 167-176.
    3. Kuhn, Michael & Ochsen, Carsten, 2009. "Demographic and geographic determinants of regional physician supply," Thuenen-Series of Applied Economic Theory 105, University of Rostock, Institute of Economics.
    4. Ozegowski, Susanne & Sundmacher, Leonie, 2012. "Ensuring access to health care—Germany reforms supply structures to tackle inequalities," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 106(2), pages 105-109.
    5. Winfried Pohlmeier & Volker Ulrich, 1995. "An Econometric Model of the Two-Part Decisionmaking Process in the Demand for Health Care," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 30(2), pages 339-361.
    6. Dionne, Georges & Langlois, Alain & Lemire, Nicole, 1987. "More on the geographical distribution of physicians," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(4), pages 365-374, December.
    7. Rochaix, Lise, 1989. "Information asymmetry and search in the market for physicians' services," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(1), pages 53-84, March.
    8. Correia Isabel & Veiga Paula, 2010. "Geographic distribution of physicians in Portugal," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 11(4), pages 383-393, August.
    9. Hendrik Jürges & Vincent Pohl, 2012. "Medical guidelines, physician density, and quality of care: evidence from German SHARE data," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 13(5), pages 635-649, October.
    10. Jeremy Hurst & Melissa Jee-Hughes, 2001. "Performance Measurement and Performance Management in OECD Health Systems," OECD Labour Market and Social Policy Occasional Papers 47, OECD Publishing.
    11. Shorrocks, A F, 1982. "Inequality Decomposition by Factor Components," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(1), pages 193-211, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:hepoli:v:120:y:2016:i:2:p:198-204. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu) or (). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/healthpol .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.