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What (or who) causes health inequalities: Theories, evidence and implications?

Author

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  • McCartney, Gerry
  • Collins, Chik
  • Mackenzie, Mhairi

Abstract

Health inequalities are the unjust differences in health between groups of people occupying different positions in society. Since the Black Report of 1980 there has been considerable effort to understand what causes them, so as to be able to identify actions to reduce them. This paper revisits and updates the proposed theories, evaluates the evidence in light of subsequent epidemiological research, and underlines the political and policy ramifications.

Suggested Citation

  • McCartney, Gerry & Collins, Chik & Mackenzie, Mhairi, 2013. "What (or who) causes health inequalities: Theories, evidence and implications?," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 113(3), pages 221-227.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:hepoli:v:113:y:2013:i:3:p:221-227
    DOI: 10.1016/j.healthpol.2013.05.021
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Bijwaard, Govert & Myrskylä, Mikko & Tynelius, Per & Rasmussen, Finn, 2016. "Education, Cognitive Ability and Cause-Specific Mortality: A Structural Approach," IZA Discussion Papers 10137, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Niccodemi, Gianmaria & Bijwaard, Govert, 2018. "Education, Intelligence and Diseases in Old Age," IZA Discussion Papers 11605, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Bijwaard, G.E.; & Tynelius, P.;, 2018. "The impact of mental problems on mortality and how it is moderated by education," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 18/16, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    4. Bijwaard, Govert & Jones, Andrew M., 2016. "Cognitive Ability and the Mortality Gradient by Education: Selection or Mediation?," IZA Discussion Papers 9798, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. repec:eee:socmed:v:200:y:2018:i:c:p:211-217 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Avni, Shlomit & Filc, Dani & Davidovitch, Nadav, 2015. "The Israeli Medical Association's discourse on health inequity," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 144(C), pages 119-126.

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