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Crossroads of family business research and firm demography—A critical assessment of family business survival rates

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  • Stamm, Isabell
  • Lubinski, Christina

Abstract

Do family firms rise and decline in three generations? Not only since Thomas Mann's “The Buddenbrooks” has the survival rate of family firms intrigued family business scholars, practitioners and consultants. In this article, we trace the family firm survival rate to its roots and discuss its empirical basis and univocal reading. We then ask how the mortality of family businesses could be measured, and which contextual factors need to be taken into account. To this end we explore the literature on firm demography, a field which is particularly concerned with age and mortality, and identify crossroads with family business studies. We conclude by suggesting a re-conceptualization of survival rates within a larger firm demographic research framework.

Suggested Citation

  • Stamm, Isabell & Lubinski, Christina, 2011. "Crossroads of family business research and firm demography—A critical assessment of family business survival rates," Journal of Family Business Strategy, Elsevier, vol. 2(3), pages 117-127.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:fambus:v:2:y:2011:i:3:p:117-127
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jfbs.2011.07.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Baronchelli, Gianpaolo & Bettinelli, Cristina & Del Bosco, Barbara & Loane, Sharon, 2016. "The impact of family involvement on the investments of Italian small-medium enterprises in psychically distant countries," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(4), pages 960-970.
    2. Wilson, Shawn R. & Whitmoyer, Jeffrey G. & Pieper, Torsten M. & Astrachan, Joseph H. & Hair, Joseph F. & Sarstedt, Marko, 2014. "Method trends and method needs: Examining methods needed for accelerating the field," Journal of Family Business Strategy, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 4-14.
    3. Paulette Robic & Dominique Barbelivien & Nicolas Antheaume, 2013. "La fabrique de l'entrepreneur familial. Une institutionnalisation du processus de transmission comme facteur de pérennité des entreprises familiales," Working Papers hal-00829947, HAL.
    4. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:1:p:246-:d:127615 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Sund, Lars-Göran & Melin, Leif & Haag, Kajsa, 2015. "Intergenerational ownership succession," Journal of Family Business Strategy, Elsevier, vol. 6(3), pages 166-177.

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