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Globalization, industrialization and urbanization in Pre-World War II Southeast Asia

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  • Huff, Gregg
  • Angeles, Luis

Abstract

This article uses new data to analyze the impact on Southeast Asian urbanization of globalization and industrialization in the world economy's core countries between the 1870s and World War II. Dramatic falls in transport costs and free trade, enforced, if necessary, by colonial rule, combined to open vast frontier areas throughout Southeast Asia to global commerce and create a handful of large urban centres. These cities, through linking Southeast Asian primary commodity exporters to world markets, grew predominantly as part of the global economy. Our econometric analysis shows that measures of globalization -- in particular industrial production in the world core and international transport costs -- are much better predictors of the size of Southeast Asia's main cities than domestic factors such as total population, GDP per capita, land area or government expenditure.

Suggested Citation

  • Huff, Gregg & Angeles, Luis, 2011. "Globalization, industrialization and urbanization in Pre-World War II Southeast Asia," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 20-36, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:exehis:v:48:y:2011:i:1:p:20-36
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Junjue Zhang & Fenzhen Su, 2020. "Land Use Change in the Major Bays Along the Coast of the South China Sea in Southeast Asia from 1988 to 2018," Land, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(1), pages 1-19, January.
    2. XuYi & Bas van Leeuwen & Jan Luiten van Zanden, 2015. "Urbanization in China, ca. 1100–1900," Working Papers 0063, Utrecht University, Centre for Global Economic History.

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