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The game of trading jobs for emissions


  • Arto, I.
  • Rueda-Cantuche, J.M.
  • Andreoni, V.
  • Mongelli, I.
  • Genty, A.


Following the debate on the implications of international trade for global climate policy, this paper introduces the topic of the economic benefits from trade obtained by exporting countries in relation to the emissions generated in the production of exports. In 2008, 24% of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and 20% of the employment around the world were linked to international trade. China “exported” 30% of emissions and hosted 37.5% of the jobs generated by trade worldwide. The European Union and the United States of America were the destination of 25% and 18.4% of the GHG emissions embodied in trade. The imports of these two regions contributed to the creation of 45% of the employment generated by international trade. This paper proposes the idea of including trade issues in international climate negotiations, taking into account not only the environmental burden generated by developed countries when displacing emissions to developing countries through their imports, but also the economic benefits of developing countries producing the goods exported to developed countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Arto, I. & Rueda-Cantuche, J.M. & Andreoni, V. & Mongelli, I. & Genty, A., 2014. "The game of trading jobs for emissions," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 517-525.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:enepol:v:66:y:2014:i:c:p:517-525 DOI: 10.1016/j.enpol.2013.11.046

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    5. José Manuel Rueda-Cantuche & Nuno Sousa & Valeria Andreoni & Iñaki Arto, 2013. "The Single Market as an Engine for Employment through External Trade," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(5), pages 931-947, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Zhang, Wencheng & Peng, Shuijun & Sun, Chuanwang, 2015. "CO2 emissions in the global supply chains of services: An analysis based on a multi-regional input–output model," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 93-103.
    2. Peng, Shuijun & Zhang, Wencheng & Sun, Chuanwang, 2016. "‘Environmental load displacement’ from the North to the South: A consumption-based perspective with a focus on China," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 128(C), pages 147-158.
    3. repec:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:7:p:1242-:d:104853 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:eee:ecolec:v:142:y:2017:i:c:p:56-69 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Koelbl, Barbara S. & van den Broek, Machteld A. & Wilting, Harry C. & Sanders, Mark W.J.L. & Bulavskaya, Tatyana & Wood, Richard & Faaij, André P.C. & van Vuuren, Detlef P., 2016. "Socio-economic impacts of low-carbon power generation portfolios: Strategies with and without CCS for the Netherlands," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 183(C), pages 257-277.
    6. Xu, Xianshuo & Zhao, Tao & Liu, Nan & Kang, Jidong, 2014. "Changes of energy-related GHG emissions in China: An empirical analysis from sectoral perspective," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 132(C), pages 298-307.
    7. Kang, Jidong & Zhao, Tao & Liu, Nan & Zhang, Xin & Xu, Xianshuo & Lin, Tao, 2014. "A multi-sectoral decomposition analysis of city-level greenhouse gas emissions: Case study of Tianjin, China," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C), pages 562-571.
    8. Monsalve, Fabio & Zafrilla, Jorge Enrique & Cadarso, María-Ángeles, 2016. "Where have all the funds gone? Multiregional input-output analysis of the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 129(C), pages 62-71.
    9. Grebel, Thomas & Stützer, Michael, 2014. "Assessment of the environmental performance of European countries over time: Addressing the role of carbon leakage and nuclear waste," Ilmenau Economics Discussion Papers 90, Ilmenau University of Technology, Institute of Economics.
    10. Kucukvar, Murat & Cansev, Bunyamin & Egilmez, Gokhan & Onat, Nuri C. & Samadi, Hamidreza, 2016. "Energy-climate-manufacturing nexus: New insights from the regional and global supply chains of manufacturing industries," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 184(C), pages 889-904.


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