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Nuclear energy consumption and economic growth in nine developed countries

  • Wolde-Rufael, Yemane
  • Menyah, Kojo
Registered author(s):

    This article attempts to test the causal relationship between nuclear energy consumption and real GDP for nine developed countries for the period 1971-2005 by including capital and labour as additional variables. Using a modified version of the Granger causality test developed by Toda and Yamamoto (1995), we found a unidirectional causality running from nuclear energy consumption to economic growth in Japan, Netherlands and Switzerland; the opposite uni-directional causality running from economic growth to nuclear energy consumption in Canada and Sweden; and a bi-directional causality running between economic growth and nuclear energy consumption in France, Spain, the United Kingdom and the United States. In Spain, the United Kingdom and the USA, increases in nuclear energy consumption caused increases in economic growth implying that conservation measures taken that reduce nuclear energy consumption may negatively affect economic growth. In France, Japan, Netherlands and Switzerland increases in nuclear energy consumption caused decreases in economic growth, suggesting that energy conservation measure taken that reduce nuclear energy consumption may help to mitigate the adverse effects of nuclear energy consumption on economic growth. In Canada and Sweden energy conservation measures affecting nuclear energy consumption may not harm economic growth.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V7G-4Y6S7MH-3/2/de9dd9c0d2e40be9298e4eac83cccba0
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Energy Economics.

    Volume (Year): 32 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 3 (May)
    Pages: 550-556

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:eneeco:v:32:y:2010:i:3:p:550-556
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/eneco

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