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Asset pricing with financial bubble risk

Listed author(s):
  • Lee, Ji Hyung
  • Phillips, Peter C.B.

This paper characterizes systematic risk stemming from the possible occurrence of price bubbles and measures the impact of this additional risk factor on asset prices. Historical stock market behavior and recent empirical experience have led economists and policy makers to acknowledge that price bubbles in financial markets do occur and need to be accounted for in risk analysis. New econometric tools for analyzing mildly explosive behavior (Phillips and Magdalinos, 2007; Phillips et al., 2011) have made it possible to detect the presence of bubbles in data and to date stamp their origination and collapse, providing empirical confirmation of such episodes in recent data. The potential for price bubbles and market collapse provides another source of stock market risk and adds to the risk premium. We provide an analytic and empirical investigation of this additional risk factor. The standard present value model is extended to allow for possible price bubbles and the effects of integrating bubble behavior into a consumption-based asset pricing model are analyzed. The theory involves attention to the investor time horizon and a study of the validity of conventional log linear approximations in the presence of nonstationary and mildly explosive data. Finite decision horizons accommodate myopic investors and are a component of speculative behavior that focuses on short run market gains rather than long run effects of fundamentals. An econometric approach to estimate bubble risk effects is developed and the methods are applied to composite stock market index data, giving new model-based equity premium and market volatility estimates that more closely match the data than traditional consumption based asset pricing models.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0927539815001206
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Empirical Finance.

Volume (Year): 38 (2016)
Issue (Month): PB ()
Pages: 590-622

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Handle: RePEc:eee:empfin:v:38:y:2016:i:pb:p:590-622
DOI: 10.1016/j.jempfin.2015.11.004
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jempfin

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  1. Peter C. B. Phillips & Shuping Shi & Jun Yu, 2015. "Testing For Multiple Bubbles: Historical Episodes Of Exuberance And Collapse In The S&P 500," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 56, pages 1043-1078, November.
  2. Mehra, Rajnish & Prescott, Edward C., 1985. "The equity premium: A puzzle," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 145-161, March.
  3. John Y. Campbell & Luis M. Viceira, 1999. "Consumption and Portfolio Decisions when Expected Returns are Time Varying," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(2), pages 433-495.
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  9. Peter C. B. Phillips & Yangru Wu & Jun Yu, 2011. "EXPLOSIVE BEHAVIOR IN THE 1990s NASDAQ: WHEN DID EXUBERANCE ESCALATE ASSET VALUES?," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 52(1), pages 201-226, 02.
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  15. Phillips, Peter C.B. & Magdalinos, Tassos, 2007. "Limit theory for moderate deviations from a unit root," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 136(1), pages 115-130, January.
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  25. Rajnish Mehra, 2003. "The Equity Premium: Why is it a Puzzle?," NBER Working Papers 9512, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  26. Phillips, Peter C.B. & Magdalinos, Tassos, 2009. "Unit Root And Cointegrating Limit Theory When Initialization Is In The Infinite Past," Econometric Theory, Cambridge University Press, vol. 25(06), pages 1682-1715, December.
  27. Jianping Mei & Hsien-Hsing Liao (ed.), 2003. "Asset Pricing," World Scientific Books, World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., number 4647, 04.
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  30. Hansen, Lars Peter & Singleton, Kenneth J, 1982. "Generalized Instrumental Variables Estimation of Nonlinear Rational Expectations Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(5), pages 1269-1286, September.
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