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Pre-holiday effect, large trades and small investor behaviour

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  • Meneu, Vicente
  • Pardo, Angel

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  • Meneu, Vicente & Pardo, Angel, 2004. "Pre-holiday effect, large trades and small investor behaviour," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 231-246, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:empfin:v:11:y:2004:i:2:p:231-246
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Cadsby, Charles Bram & Ratner, Mitchell, 1992. "Turn-of-month and pre-holiday effects on stock returns: Some international evidence," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 497-509, June.
    2. Barone, E., 1990. "The italian stock market : Efficiency and calendar anomalies," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 14(2-3), pages 483-510, August.
    3. Steeley, James M., 2001. "A note on information seasonality and the disappearance of the weekend effect in the UK stock market," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 25(10), pages 1941-1956, October.
    4. Josef Lakonishok, Seymour Smidt, 1988. "Are Seasonal Anomalies Real? A Ninety-Year Perspective," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 1(4), pages 403-425.
    5. Easley, David & O'Hara, Maureen, 1987. "Price, trade size, and information in securities markets," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 69-90, September.
    6. Zainudin Arsad & J. Andrew Coutts, 1997. "Security price anomalies in the London International Stock Exchange: a 60 year perspective," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(5), pages 455-464.
    7. Chien, Chin-Chen & Lee, Cheng-few & Wang, Andrew M. L., 2002. "A note on stock market seasonality: The impact of stock price volatility on the application of dummy variable regression model," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 155-162.
    8. Terence Mills & J. Andrew Coutts, 1995. "Calendar effects in the London Stock Exchange FT-SE indices," The European Journal of Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 79-93.
    9. Pettengill, Glenn N, 1989. "Holiday Closings and Security Returns," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 12(1), pages 57-67, Spring.
    10. Paul Brockman & David Michayluk, 1998. "The persistent holiday effect: additional evidence," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 5(4), pages 205-209.
    11. Donald B. Keim, "undated". "Trading Patterns, Bid-Ask Spreads and Estimated Security Returns: The Case of Common Stocks at Calendar Turning Points (Reprint 008)," Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research Working Papers 22-89, Wharton School Rodney L. White Center for Financial Research.
    12. Ariel, Robert A, 1990. " High Stock Returns before Holidays: Existence and Evidence on Possible Causes," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 45(5), pages 1611-1626, December.
    13. Brian Lucey, 2005. "Are local or international influences responsible for the pre-holiday behaviour of Irish equities?," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(6), pages 381-389.
    14. Gultekin, Mustafa N. & Gultekin, N. Bulent, 1983. "Stock market seasonality : International Evidence," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 469-481, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mehmet Akbulut & Su Han Chan & Mariya Letdin, 2015. "Calendar Anomalies: Do REITs Behave Like Stocks?," International Real Estate Review, Asian Real Estate Society, vol. 18(2), pages 177-215.
    2. Thanasis N. Christodoulopoulos & Ioulia Grigoratou, 2005. "Measuring Liquidity in the Greek Government Securities Market," Working Papers 23, Bank of Greece.
    3. Qadan, Mahmoud & Kliger, Doron, 2016. "The short trading day anomaly," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 38(PA), pages 62-80.
    4. Rayenda Brahmana & Chee Wooi Hooy & Zamri Ahmad, 2014. "The Role of Weather on Investors’ Monday Irrationality: Insights from Malaysia," Contemporary Economics, University of Finance and Management in Warsaw, vol. 8(2), June.
    5. Paulo M. Gama & Elisabete F. S. Vieira, 2013. "Another look at the holiday effect," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(20), pages 1623-1633, October.
    6. repec:eee:finana:v:56:y:2018:i:c:p:32-51 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Lahav, Eyal & Shavit, Tal & Benzion, Uri, 2016. "Can't wait to celebrate: Holiday euphoria, impulsive behavior and time preference," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 128-134.
    8. Michele Costola & Massimiliano Caporin, 2016. "Rational Learning For Risk-Averse Investors By Conditioning On Behavioral Choices," Annals of Financial Economics (AFE), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 11(01), pages 1-26, March.
    9. Dumitriu, Ramona & Stefanescu, Razvan & Nistor, Costel, 2012. "Holiday effects during quiet and turbulent times," MPRA Paper 41625, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 07 Mar 2012.
    10. Yuan, Tian & Gupta, Rakesh, 2014. "Chinese Lunar New Year effect in Asian stock markets, 1999–2012," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 54(4), pages 529-537.

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