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Does prenatal healthcare improve child birthweight outcomes in Azerbaijan? Results of the national Demographic and Health Survey

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  • Habibov, Nazim N.
  • Fan, Lida

Abstract

This paper evaluates the effectiveness of prenatal healthcare in Azerbaijan on improving child birthweight using the 2006 Azerbaijan Demographic and Health Survey, a nationally representative survey of reproductive aged women. Two measures of prenatal health utilization are used to measure healthcare input--the number of prenatal visits and the quality index of health care. Endogeneity in prenatal healthcare utilization is controlled by 2SLS regression. Selection bias of probability of child being weighed is controlled by a binomial probit regression. We found that prenatal healthcare does improve child birthweight. The results of the 2SLS suggest that an additional prenatal visit increases birthweight by about 26Â g, or approximately 0.8% of the raw mean of birthweight in the country. Likewise, a unit increase in quality of prenatal healthcare increases birthweight by 21Â g or by approximately 1.3% of the birthweight. In general, the magnitude of prenatal care impact in Azerbaijan is comparable with that in other countries.

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  • Habibov, Nazim N. & Fan, Lida, 2011. "Does prenatal healthcare improve child birthweight outcomes in Azerbaijan? Results of the national Demographic and Health Survey," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 9(1), pages 56-65, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ehbiol:v:9:y:2011:i:1:p:56-65
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    Cited by:

    1. Makate, Marshall & Makate, Clifton, 2016. "Demand for prenatal care and its impact on neonatal, infant and child mortality in Zimbabwe: Evidence from the Demographic and Health Surveys," MPRA Paper 72805, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 31 Jul 2016.
    2. Edward N. Okeke & Amalavoyal V. Chari, 2015. "Can Institutional Deliveries Reduce Newborn Mortality? Evidence from Rwanda," Working Papers WR-1072, RAND Corporation.
    3. Habibov, Nazim N., 2012. "Does childcare have an impact on the quality of parent–child interaction? Evidence from post-Soviet Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(12), pages 2367-2373.
    4. repec:eee:socmed:v:189:y:2017:i:c:p:25-34 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Delajara, Marcelo & Wendelspiess Chávez Juárez, Florian, 2013. "Birthweight outcomes in Bolivia: The role of maternal height, ethnicity, and behavior," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 56-68.

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