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The paradox of China's growing under-urbanization


  • Chang, Gene Hsin
  • Brada, Josef C.


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  • Chang, Gene Hsin & Brada, Josef C., 2006. "The paradox of China's growing under-urbanization," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 24-40, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecosys:v:30:y:2006:i:1:p:24-40

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Davis, James C. & Henderson, J. Vernon, 2003. "Evidence on the political economy of the urbanization process," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 98-125, January.
    2. International Monetary Fund, 1997. "Sierra Leone; Recent Economic Developments," IMF Staff Country Reports 97/47, International Monetary Fund.
    3. Zhang, Kevin Honglin & Song, Shunfeng, 2003. "Rural-urban migration and urbanization in China: Evidence from time-series and cross-section analyses," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 386-400.
    4. Moomaw, Ronald L. & Shatter, Ali M., 1996. "Urbanization and Economic Development: A Bias toward Large Cities?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 13-37, July.
    5. Laurence J. C. Ma & Ming Fan, 1994. "Urbanisation from Below: The Growth of Towns in Jiangsu, China," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 31(10), pages 1625-1645, December.
    6. Taylor, J. Edward & Martin, Philip L., 2001. "Human capital: Migration and rural population change," Handbook of Agricultural Economics,in: B. L. Gardner & G. C. Rausser (ed.), Handbook of Agricultural Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 9, pages 457-511 Elsevier.
    7. Zuohong Pan & Fan Zhang, 2002. "Urban Productivity in China," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 39(12), pages 2267-2281, November.
    8. Xiaobin Zhao & Li Zhang, 1995. "Urban Performance and the Control of Urban Size in China," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 32(4-5), pages 813-846, May.
    9. Chang, Gene Hsin & Wen, Guanzhong James, 1997. "Communal Dining and the Chinese Famine of 1958-1961," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 46(1), pages 1-34, October.
    10. Henderson, Vernon, 2003. "The Urbanization Process and Economic Growth: The So-What Question," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 8(1), pages 47-71, March.
    11. Rawski, Thomas G., 2001. "What is happening to China's GDP statistics?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 347-354.
    12. Henderson, Vernon, 2000. "How urban concentration affects economic growth," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2326, The World Bank.
    13. Petrakos, George & Brada, Josef C, 1989. "Metropolitan Concentration in Developing Countries," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 42(4), pages 557-578.
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    Cited by:

    1. Thomas Vendryes, 2011. "Migration constraints and development: Hukou and capital accumulation in China," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-00783794, HAL.
    2. Alexandra SCHAFFAR, 2008. "Regional Income Inequality And Urbanisation Trends In China: 1978-2005," Region et Developpement, Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var, vol. 28, pages 87-110.
    3. Johansson, Anders C. & Wang, Xun, 2015. "Financial Liberalization and Urbanization," Stockholm School of Economics Asia Working Paper Series 2015-35, Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm China Economic Research Institute.
    4. Heyuan You, 2016. "Quantifying the coordinated degree of urbanization in Shanghai, China," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 50(3), pages 1273-1283, May.
    5. Ye, Liming & Tang, Huajun & Wu, Wenbin & Yang, Peng & Nelson, Gerald C. & Mason-D'Croz, Daniel & Palazzo, Amanda, 2014. "Chinese food security and climate change: Agriculture futures," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 8, pages 1-39.
    6. Su, Yaqin & Tesfazion, Petros & Zhao, Zhong, 2017. "Where Are Migrants from? Inter- vs. Intra-Provincial Rural-Urban Migration in China," IZA Discussion Papers 11029, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Tie-Ying Liu & Chi-Wei Su & Xu-Zhao Jiang, 2016. "Is China’S Urbanization Convergent?," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 61(05), pages 1-18, December.
    8. Canfei He & Xiyan Mao, 2016. "Population dynamics and regional development in China," Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, Cambridge Political Economy Society, vol. 9(3), pages 535-549.

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