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The effects of high-quality student mentoring

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  • Sandner, Malte

Abstract

This paper evaluates the impact of a university mentoring program for first semester economics and management students on academic performance. For identification, I use a difference-in-differences approach with students in a similar degree program as control group. The mentoring program decreases failure rates by 15.4 percentage points. These large effects can be explained by quality features of the mentoring program, including graduate mentors, a low mentor-to-mentee ratio and compulsory, pre-scheduled, face-to-face appointments.

Suggested Citation

  • Sandner, Malte, 2015. "The effects of high-quality student mentoring," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 136(C), pages 227-232.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:136:y:2015:i:c:p:227-232
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2015.09.043
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Chevalier, Arnaud & Gibbons, Steve & Thorpe, Andy & Snell, Martin & Hoskins, Sherria, 2009. "Students' academic self-perception," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 716-727, December.
    2. Philip Oreopoulos & Daniel Lang & Joshua Angrist, 2009. "Incentives and Services for College Achievement: Evidence from a Randomized Trial," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 1(1), pages 136-163, January.
    3. Todd Stinebrickner & Ralph Stinebrickner, 2012. "Learning about Academic Ability and the College Dropout Decision," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 30(4), pages 707-748.
    4. Basit Zafar, 2011. "How Do College Students Form Expectations?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 29(2), pages 301-348.
    5. Stephen G. Donald & Kevin Lang, 2007. "Inference with Difference-in-Differences and Other Panel Data," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(2), pages 221-233, May.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Student mentoring; Natural experiment; Difference-in-differences;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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