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The Great Recession and the inflation puzzle

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  • Matheson, Troy
  • Stavrev, Emil

Abstract

Notwithstanding high unemployment following the Great Recession, inflation in the United States has been remarkably stable. We find that a traditional Phillips curve describes the behavior of inflation reasonably well since the 1960s. Using a non-linear Kalman filter that allows for time-varying parameters, we find that three factors have contributed to the observed stability of inflation: inflation expectations have become better anchored and to a lower level; the slope of the Phillips curve has flattened; and the importance of import-price inflation has increased.

Suggested Citation

  • Matheson, Troy & Stavrev, Emil, 2013. "The Great Recession and the inflation puzzle," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 120(3), pages 468-472.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:120:y:2013:i:3:p:468-472
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2013.06.001
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Laurence Ball & Sandeep Mazumder, 2011. "Inflation Dynamics and the Great Recession," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 42(1 (Spring), pages 337-405.
    2. James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson, 2010. "Modeling inflation after the crisis," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 173-220.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jaromir Baxa & Miroslav Plasil & Borek Vasicek, 2013. "Inflation and the Steeplechase Between Economic Activity Variables," Working Papers 2013/15, Czech National Bank, Research Department.
    2. Karol Szafranek, 2016. "Linking excessive disinflation and output movements in an emerging, small open economy A hybrid New Keynesian Phillips Curve perspective," NBP Working Papers 239, Narodowy Bank Polski, Economic Research Department.
    3. Christian Gillitzer & John Simon, 2015. "Inflation Targeting: A Victim of Its Own Success," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 11(4), pages 259-287, September.
    4. Marco Causi & Andrea Baldini, 2018. "Determinants Of Loan And Bad Loan Dynamics: Evidence From Italy," Departmental Working Papers of Economics - University 'Roma Tre' o232, Department of Economics - University Roma Tre.
    5. Olivier Blanchard & Eugenio Cerutti & Lawrence Summers, 2015. "Inflation and Activity – Two Explorations and their Monetary Policy Implications," NBER Working Papers 21726, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Dany-Knedlik, Geraldine & Holtemöller, Oliver, 2017. "Inflation dynamics during the financial crisis in Europe: Cross-sectional identification of long-run inflation expectations," IWH Discussion Papers 10/2017, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).
    7. A. Stevens, 2013. "What inflation developments reveal about the Phillips curve: implications for monetary policy," Economic Review, National Bank of Belgium, issue iii, pages 67-76, December.
    8. José Antonio Gibanel Salazar, 2014. "Economic models: comparative analysis of their adjustment and prediction capacities," Contribuciones a la Economía, Grupo Eumed.net (Universidad de Málaga), issue 2014-05, November.
    9. repec:rfa:aefjnl:v:4:y:2017:i:3:p:77-88 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Luis J. Álvarez & Isabel Sánchez, 2017. "A suite of inflation forecasting models," Occasional Papers 1703, Banco de España;Occasional Papers Homepage.
    11. Francesca Rondina, 2017. "Model Uncertainty and the Direction of Fit of the Postwar U.S. Phillips Curve(s)," Working Papers 1702E, University of Ottawa, Department of Economics.
    12. Suleyman Hilmi Kal & Ferhat Arslaner & Nuran Arslaner, 2015. "Sources of Asymmetry and Non-linearity in Pass-Through of Exchange Rate and Import Price to Consumer Price Inflation for the Turkish Economy during Inflation Targeting Regime," Working Papers 1530, Research and Monetary Policy Department, Central Bank of the Republic of Turkey.
    13. Olivier Coibion & Yuriy Gorodnichenko & Dmitri Koustas, 2013. "Amerisclerosis? The Puzzle of Rising U.S. Unemployment Persistence," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 44(2 (Fall)), pages 193-260.
    14. López Pérez, Víctor, 2015. "Do professional forecasters behave as if they believed in the new Keynesian Phillips Curve for the euro area?," Working Paper Series 1763, European Central Bank.
    15. Szafranek, Karol, 2017. "Flattening of the New Keynesian Phillips curve: Evidence for an emerging, small open economy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 334-348.
    16. Michal Andrle & Oxana Babecka Kucharcukova & Jaromir Baxa & Jan Bruha & Peter Claeys & Jan Filacek & Jakub Mateju & Miroslav Plasil & Serhat Solmaz & Borek Vasicek, 2015. "Monetary Policy Challenges in a Low-Inflation Environment," Occasional Publications - Edited Volumes, Czech National Bank, Research Department, edition 2, volume 13, number rb13/2 edited by Jan Babecky & Michal Franta.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Inflation; Unemployment; Phillips curve;

    JEL classification:

    • C53 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Forecasting and Prediction Models; Simulation Methods
    • E37 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications

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