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On public capital hypothesis with breaks

  • Musolesi, Antonio
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    This paper further investigates the link between private output and public infrastructure capital for four advanced economies by using a general type of cointegration that allows for parameter changes at an a priori undetermined point in time.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V84-517BB1D-1/2/443c3af4b3bb355951ce26673b83121a
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

    Volume (Year): 110 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 1 (January)
    Pages: 20-24

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:110:y:2011:i:1:p:20-24
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolet

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    1. John A. Tatom, 1991. "Public capital and private sector performance," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue May, pages 3-15.
    2. Theo S Eicher & Stephen Turnovsky, 1998. "Scale, Congestion, and Growth," Discussion Papers in Economics at the University of Washington 0071, Department of Economics at the University of Washington.
    3. Gregory, A.W. & Hansen, B.E., 1992. "Residual-Based Tests for Cointegration in Models with Regime Shifts," RCER Working Papers 335, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
    4. David Aschauer, 1988. "Does public capital crowd out private capital?," Staff Memoranda 88-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
    5. Aschauer, David Alan, 1989. "Is public expenditure productive?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 177-200, March.
    6. Perron, Pierre, 1997. "Further evidence on breaking trend functions in macroeconomic variables," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 80(2), pages 355-385, October.
    7. Alicia H. Munnell, 1990. "Why has productivity growth declined? Productivity and public investment," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Jan, pages 3-22.
    8. Daniel Montolio & Albert Solé-Ollé, 2009. "Road investment and regional productivity growth: the effects of vehicle intensity and congestion," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 88(1), pages 99-118, 03.
    9. Alfredo M. Pereira, 2000. "Is All Public Capital Created Equal?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 82(3), pages 513-518, August.
    10. Gregory, Allan W & Hansen, Bruce E, 1996. "Tests for Cointegration in Models with Regime and Trend Shifts," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 58(3), pages 555-60, August.
    11. Bierens, Herman J., 1997. "Testing the unit root with drift hypothesis against nonlinear trend stationarity, with an application to the US price level and interest rate," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 29-64, November.
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