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Agriculture and aggregation

  • Córdoba, Juan Carlos
  • Ripoll, Marla

We study the shape of the aggregate production function in the presence of land-intensive agriculture. The traditional Cobb-Douglas formulation is corrected to include a "diversification component." The implied TFP differences across countries are larger than what Solow residuals suggest.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6V84-4WN2XP0-1/2/2c323be6907748cf0b74e36d814f36e0
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 105 (2009)
Issue (Month): 1 (October)
Pages: 110-112

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:105:y:2009:i:1:p:110-112
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolet

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  1. Richard Rogerson, 2001. "Farm Work, Home Work and International Productivity Differences," Center for Development Economics 170, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  2. Caselli, Francesco, 2004. "Accounting for Cross-Country Income Differences," CEPR Discussion Papers 4703, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Why Do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output per Worker than Others?," NBER Working Papers 6564, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Diego Restuccia & Dennis Tao Yang & Xiaodong Zhu, 2003. "Agriculture and Aggregate Productivity: A Quantitative Cross-Country Analysis," Working Papers diegor-03-01, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
  5. Jonathan Temple & Ludger Woessmann, 2004. "Dualism and Cross-Country Growth Regressions," CESifo Working Paper Series 1290, CESifo Group Munich.
  6. Douglas Gollin, 2002. "Getting Income Shares Right," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 110(2), pages 458-474, April.
  7. Peter Klenow & Andrés Rodríguez-Clare, 1997. "The Neoclassical Revival in Growth Economics: Has It Gone Too Far?," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1997, Volume 12, pages 73-114 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Vollrath, Dietrich, 2009. "How important are dual economy effects for aggregate productivity?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(2), pages 325-334, March.
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