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Agriculture and Aggregation

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  • Cordoba, Juan Carlos
  • Ripoll, Marla

Abstract

We study the shape of the aggregate production function in the presence of land-intensive agriculture. The traditional Cobb-Douglas formulation is corrected to include a "diversification component." The implied TFP differences across countries are larger than what Solow residuals suggest.
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Suggested Citation

  • Cordoba, Juan Carlos & Ripoll, Marla, 2010. "Agriculture and Aggregation," Staff General Research Papers Archive 32115, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:isu:genres:32115
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Caselli, Francesco, 2005. "Accounting for Cross-Country Income Differences," Handbook of Economic Growth,in: Philippe Aghion & Steven Durlauf (ed.), Handbook of Economic Growth, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 9, pages 679-741 Elsevier.
    2. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Why do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output Per Worker than Others?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(1), pages 83-116.
    3. Douglas Gollin & Stephen L. Parente & Richard Rogerson, 2004. "Farm Work, Home Work, and International Productivity Differences," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 7(4), pages 827-850, October.
    4. Restuccia, Diego & Yang, Dennis Tao & Zhu, Xiaodong, 2008. "Agriculture and aggregate productivity: A quantitative cross-country analysis," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, pages 234-250.
    5. Restuccia, Diego & Yang, Dennis Tao & Zhu, Xiaodong, 2008. "Agriculture and aggregate productivity: A quantitative cross-country analysis," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, pages 234-250.
    6. Jonathan Temple & Ludger Wößmann, 2006. "Dualism and cross-country growth regressions," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 11(3), pages 187-228, September.
    7. Vollrath, Dietrich, 2009. "How important are dual economy effects for aggregate productivity?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, pages 325-334.
    8. Douglas Gollin, 2002. "Getting Income Shares Right," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 110(2), pages 458-474, April.
    9. Peter Klenow & Andrés Rodríguez-Clare, 1997. "The Neoclassical Revival in Growth Economics: Has It Gone Too Far?," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1997, Volume 12, pages 73-114 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Vollrath, Dietrich, 2014. "The efficiency of human capital allocations in developing countries," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, pages 106-118.
    2. Alonso-Carrera, Jaime & Raurich, Xavier, 2010. "Growth, sectoral composition, and the evolution of income levels," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, pages 2440-2460.
    3. Areendam Chanda & Carl-Johan Dalgaard, 2008. "Dual Economies and International Total Factor Productivity Differences: Channelling the Impact from Institutions, Trade, and Geography," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 75(300), pages 629-661, November.
    4. Marla, Ripoll & Juan, Cordoba, 2006. "The Role of Education in Development," MPRA Paper 1864, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Feb 2007.
    5. Alex Mourmouras & Peter Rangazas, 2009. "Reconciling Kuznets and Habbakuk in a unified growth theory," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 14(2), pages 149-181, June.
    6. Córdoba, Juan Carlos & Ripoll, Marla, 2009. "Agriculture and aggregation," Economics Letters, Elsevier, pages 110-112.
    7. Dietrich Vollrath, 2013. "Measuring Aggregate Agricultural Labor Effort in Dual Economies," Eurasian Economic Review, Springer;Eurasia Business and Economics Society, pages 39-58.
    8. Trevor Tombe, 2010. "The Missing Food Problem: How Low Agricultural Imports Contribute to International Income and Productivity Differences," Working Papers tecipa-416, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
    9. Córdoba, Juan Carlos & Ripoll, Marla, 2008. "Endogenous TFP and cross-country income differences," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, pages 1158-1170.
    10. Bronzini, Raffaello & Piselli, Paolo, 2016. "The impact of R&D subsidies on firm innovation," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 442-457.
    11. Cai, Wenbiao, 2010. "Skill Investment, Farm Size Distribution and Agricultural Productivity," MPRA Paper 26439, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Córdoba, Juan Carlos & Ripoll, Marla, 2008. "Endogenous TFP and cross-country income differences," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, pages 1158-1170.
    13. Herrendorf, Berthold & Valentinyi, Akos, 2005. "What Sectors Make the Poor Countries So Unproductive?," CEPR Discussion Papers 5399, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    14. Trevor Tombe, 2012. "The Missing Food Problem," Working Papers tt0060, Wilfrid Laurier University, Department of Economics, revised 2012.
    15. María Dolores Guilló & Fidel Pérez Sebastián, 2006. "The Quest for Productivity Growth in Agriculture and Manufacturing," DEGIT Conference Papers c011_005, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
    16. repec:bla:jpbect:v:19:y:2017:i:4:p:789-810 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. G. Candela & M. Castellani & R. Dieci, 2015. "The wise use of leisure time. A three-sector endogenous growth model with leisure services," Working Papers wp1010, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.

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