IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

Making long-term economic growth more sustainable: evaluating the costs and benefits


  • Islam, Sardar M. N.
  • Munasinghe, Mohan
  • Clarke, Matthew


No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Islam, Sardar M. N. & Munasinghe, Mohan & Clarke, Matthew, 2003. "Making long-term economic growth more sustainable: evaluating the costs and benefits," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(2-3), pages 149-166, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:47:y:2003:i:2-3:p:149-166

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Kolstad, Charles D. & Krautkraemer, Jeffrey A., 1993. "Natural resource use and the environment," Handbook of Natural Resource and Energy Economics,in: A. V. Kneese† & J. L. Sweeney (ed.), Handbook of Natural Resource and Energy Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 26, pages 1219-1265 Elsevier.
    2. England, Richard W., 2000. "Natural capital and the theory of economic growth," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 425-431, September.
    3. Pezzey, J., 1992. "Sustainable Development Concepts; An Economic Analysis," Papers 2, World Bank - The World Bank Environment Paper.
    4. Girma, Messaye, 1992. "Macropolicy and the environment: A framework for analysis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 531-540, April.
    5. Munasinghe, Mohan, 1999. "Is environmental degradation an inevitable consequence of economic growth: tunneling through the environmental Kuznets curve," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 89-109, April.
    6. Solow, Robert M, 1986. " On the Intergenerational Allocation of Natural Resources," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 88(1), pages 141-149.
    7. Theodore Panayotou, 2000. "Economic Growth and the Environment," CID Working Papers 56, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    8. Ayres, Robert U., 1996. "Limits to the growth paradigm," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 117-134, November.
    9. Ricardo, David, 1821. "On the Principles of Political Economy and Taxation," History of Economic Thought Books, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, edition 3, number ricardo1821.
    10. Tjalling C. Koopmans, 1973. "Some Observations on 'Optimal' Economic Growth and Exhaustible Resources," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 356, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
    11. Kessler, J. J. & Van Dorp, M., 1998. "Structural adjustment and the environment: the need for an analytical methodology," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 267-281, December.
    12. Leontief, Wassily, 1970. "Environmental Repercussions and the Economic Structure: An Input-Output Approach," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 52(3), pages 262-271, August.
    13. Mäler, Karl-Göran & Munasinghe, Mohan, 1996. "Macroeconomic policies, second-best theory and the environment," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 1(02), pages 149-163, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Brennan, Andrew John, 2008. "Theoretical foundations of sustainable economic welfare indicators -- ISEW and political economy of the disembedded system," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 1-19, August.
    2. Trommetter, Michel, 2005. "Biodiversity and international stakes: A question of access," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(4), pages 573-583, June.
    3. Matthew Clarke & Sardar M. N. Islam, 2006. "National account measures and sustainability objectives: present approaches and future prospects," Sustainable Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(4), pages 219-233.
    4. Clarke, Matthew & Islam, Sardar M.N., 2005. "Diminishing and negative welfare returns of economic growth: an index of sustainable economic welfare (ISEW) for Thailand," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 81-93, July.
    5. Helen Scarborough & Jeff Bennett, 2012. "Cost–Benefit Analysis and Distributional Preferences," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14376.
    6. Shiyi Chen, 2009. "Engine or drag: Can high energy consumption and CO 2 emission drive the sustainable development of Chinese industry?," Frontiers of Economics in China, Springer;Higher Education Press, vol. 4(4), pages 548-571, December.
    7. Nelson Jorge Ribeiro Duarte & Francisco José Lopes de Sousa Diniz, 2011. "The Role Of Firms And Entrepreneurship On Local Development," Romanian Journal of Regional Science, Romanian Regional Science Association, vol. 5(1), pages 54-69, JUNE.
    8. Wen, Zongguo & Chen, Jining, 2008. "A cost-benefit analysis for the economic growth in China," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(2), pages 356-366, April.
    9. Matthew Clarke & Sardar M. N. Islam, 2003. "Health Adjusted GDP (HAGDP) Measures of the Relationship Between Economic Growth, Health Outcomes and Social Welfare," CESifo Working Paper Series 1002, CESifo Group Munich.

    More about this item


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:47:y:2003:i:2-3:p:149-166. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.