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On the relationship between GDP and health care expenditure: A new look

  • Lago-Peñas, Santiago
  • Cantarero-Prieto, David
  • Blázquez-Fernández, Carla

In this paper we analyze the relationship between income and health expenditure in 31 Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries. We focus on the differences between short and long term elasticities and we also check the adjustment process of health care expenditure to changes in per capita Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and its cyclical and trend components. In both cases, we test if results differ in countries with a higher share of private expenditure on total health expenditure. Econometric results show that the long-run income elasticity is close to unity, that health expenditure is more sensitive to per capita income cyclical movements than to trend movements, and that the adjustment to income changes in those countries with a higher share of private health expenditure over total expenditure is faster.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economic Modelling.

Volume (Year): 32 (2013)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 124-129

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:32:y:2013:i:c:p:124-129
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/30411

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