IDEAS home Printed from
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Kinetics of jobs in multi-link cities with migration-driven aggregation process

  • Sun, Ruoyan
Registered author(s):

    Immigration has long been a hotly debated issue. The core of this debate is immigrants' impact on local job markets. Some people insist that instead of creating more jobs, immigrants actually take away more jobs thus decrease the living standard of natives. Others argue that the presence of immigrants benefits the society as a whole since they enlarge the labor force and lower the production cost. In this paper, we propose a model describing the migration-driven aggregation behaviors in job markets with foreign immigration, and introduce the method of network and aggregation to look at this issue from a new perspective. We divide the job market in each city into two groups: native and immigrant. And we view each city as a node with l links; each link represents a way of transportation to other cities. Then it is not hard to see that cities with more links tend to be more job concentrated with larger flows of jobs. We assume that both native and immigrant job markets have a migration of jobs within themselves and the native ones have birth rate and death rate of jobs as well. Through analyzing different rates: K1 and K2, initial conditions, and the combined effect of birth rate and death rate, we are able to predict the changes of some variables in the long run. These changes indicate the impact of immigrants on native job markets. Thus provide some helpful information to this issue.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economic Modelling.

    Volume (Year): 30 (2013)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 36-41

    in new window

    Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:30:y:2013:i:c:p:36-41
    Contact details of provider: Web page:

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. Ziesemer, Thomas H.W., 2010. "The impact of the credit crisis on poor developing countries: Growth, worker remittances, accumulation and migration," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 1230-1245, September.
    2. Brito, Paulo & Dilão, Rui, 2010. "Equilibrium price dynamics in an overlapping-generations exchange economy," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 343-355, May.
    3. Konan, Denise Eby, 2011. "Limits to growth: Tourism and regional labor migration," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(1-2), pages 473-481, January.
    4. Horst, Ulrich & Scheinkman, José A., 2009. "A limit theorem for systems of social interactions," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(9-10), pages 609-623, September.
    5. Gupta, Manash Ranjan & Dutta, Priya Brata, 2011. "Skilled-unskilled wage inequality and unemployment: A general equilibrium analysis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 1977-1983, July.
    6. Bellaïche, Joël, 2010. "On the path-dependence of economic growth," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 163-178, March.
    7. Zvi Eckstein & Suqin Ge & Barbara Petrongolo, 2011. "Job and wage mobility with minimum wages and imperfect compliance," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 26(4), pages 580-612, 06.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:30:y:2013:i:c:p:36-41. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Zhang, Lei)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.