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Improvement in information and private investment in education


  • Eckwert, Bernhard
  • Zilcha, Itzhak


This paper uses the framework of an OLG economy for an analysis of the dynamic interaction between the precision of information about individual skills, investment in education, human capital accumulation, and social welfare. The human capital of an individual depends on both his (subjectively) random ability and his investment in education. Individual investment in education is financed through a loan contract with income-contingent terms of repayment. Investment decisions are based on public signals (test outcomes) which screen all agents for their abilities. We find that better information, which allows more efficient screening, enhances aggregate human capital formation but may, at the same time, stifle aggregate investment in education. Moreover, social welfare may increase or decline depending on the transformation technology and on the relative measure of risk aversion.

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  • Eckwert, Bernhard & Zilcha, Itzhak, 2010. "Improvement in information and private investment in education," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 585-597, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:dyncon:v:34:y:2010:i:4:p:585-597

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Diego Restuccia & Carlos Urrutia, 2004. "Intergenerational Persistence of Earnings: The Role of Early and College Education," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(5), pages 1354-1378, December.
    2. Card, David & Krueger, Alan B, 1992. "Does School Quality Matter? Returns to Education and the Characteristics of Public Schools in the United States," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 100(1), pages 1-40, February.
    3. Caucutt, Elizabeth M. & Kumar, Krishna B., 2003. "Higher education subsidies and heterogeneity: a dynamic analysis," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 27(8), pages 1459-1502, June.
    4. Sandmo, Agnar, 1971. "On the Theory of the Competitive Firm under Price Uncertainty," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 61(1), pages 65-73, March.
    5. Checchi,Daniele, 2008. "The Economics of Education," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521066464, March.
    6. Paul R. Milgrom, 1981. "Good News and Bad News: Representation Theorems and Applications," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 12(2), pages 380-391, Autumn.
    7. Ionescu Felicia A, 2008. "Consolidation of Student Loan Repayments and Default Incentives," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 8(1), pages 1-37, August.
    8. Lleras,Miguel Palacios, 2004. "Investing in Human Capital," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521828406, March.
    9. David Greenaway & Michelle Haynes, 2003. "Funding Higher Education in The UK: The Role of Fees and Loans," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(485), pages 150-166, February.
    10. Feldman, Mark & Gilles, Christian, 1985. "An expository note on individual risk without aggregate uncertainty," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 26-32, February.
    11. Edward E. Schlee, 2001. "The Value of Information in Efficient Risk-Sharing Arrangements," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(3), pages 509-524, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Blankenau, William F. & Gao, Yuan, 2014. "Admission standards, student effort, and the creation of skilled jobs," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 209-216.
    2. Bernhard Eckwert & Itzhak Zilcha, 2016. "Student Loans: When is Risk Sharing Desirable?," CESifo Working Paper Series 5718, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. repec:bla:ijethy:v:13:y:2017:i:2:p:217-231 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Bernhard Eckwert & Itzhak Zilcha, 2011. "Competition in Funding Higher Education," CESifo Working Paper Series 3588, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Hatsor, Limor, 2015. "Higher education funding: The value of information," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 137(C), pages 230-233.


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