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A dynamic model of job networking and social influences on employment

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  • Krauth, Brian V.

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  • Krauth, Brian V., 2004. "A dynamic model of job networking and social influences on employment," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 28(6), pages 1185-1204, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:dyncon:v:28:y:2004:i:6:p:1185-1204
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mortensen, Dale & Pissarides, Christopher, 2011. "Job Creation and Job Destruction in the Theory of Unemployment," Economic Policy, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, vol. 1, pages 1-19.
    2. Jens Otto Ludwig & Greg Duncan & Joshua C. Pinkston, 2000. "Neighborhood Effects on Economic Self-Sufficiency: Evidence from a Randomized Housing-Mobility Experiment," JCPR Working Papers 159, Northwestern University/University of Chicago Joint Center for Poverty Research.
    3. Holzer, Harry J, 1987. "Informal Job Search and Black Youth Unemployment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(3), pages 446-452, June.
    4. Datcher, Linda, 1983. "The Impact of Informal Networks of Quit Behavior," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 65(3), pages 491-495, August.
    5. Mortensen, Dale T. & Pissarides, Christopher A., 1999. "Job reallocation, employment fluctuations and unemployment," Handbook of Macroeconomics,in: J. B. Taylor & M. Woodford (ed.), Handbook of Macroeconomics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 18, pages 1171-1228 Elsevier.
    6. Brian Krauth, 2000. "Social Interactions, Thresholds, and Unemployment in Neighborhoods," Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 1638, Econometric Society.
    7. Giorgio Topa, 2001. "Social Interactions, Local Spillovers and Unemployment," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 68(2), pages 261-295.
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    Cited by:

    1. Thomas K. Bauer & Michael Fertig & Matthias Vorell, 2011. "Neighborhood Effects and Individual Unemployment," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 409, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    2. Yannis M. Ioannides & Linda Datcher Loury, 2004. "Job Information Networks, Neighborhood Effects, and Inequality," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 42(4), pages 1056-1093, December.
    3. repec:zbw:rwirep:0285 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Simon Gemkow & Michael Neugart, 2011. "Referral hiring, endogenous social networks, and inequality: an agent-based analysis," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 21(4), pages 703-719, October.
    5. Thomas K. Bauer & Michael Fertig & Matthias Vorell, 2011. "Neighborhood Eff ects and Individual Unemployment," Ruhr Economic Papers 0285, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    6. Bramoullé, Yann & Saint-Paul, Gilles, 2010. "Social networks and labor market transitions," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 188-195, January.
    7. LIU Yang, 2015. "The Role of Individual Social Capital in Wage Determination: Evidence from China," Discussion papers 15133, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).

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