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No toilet no bride? Intrahousehold bargaining in male-skewed marriage markets in India

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  • Stopnitzky, Yaniv

Abstract

Haryana state in India is characterized by widespread discrimination against women, including a severe population-level sex imbalance. In this context an innovative social marketing campaign, which targeted pro-sanitation messages to households active in local marriage markets, was implemented with the goal of increasing toilet ownership. This paper estimates the impact of this program, known colloquially as “No Toilet No Bride”, on household-level latrine ownership. Private sanitation coverage in Haryana increased by 21% specifically among households with boys active on the marriage market. This effect is larger and concentrated in marriage markets where women are relatively scarce and absent when women are relatively abundant, which together suggest the program operated by successfully linking sanitation outcomes with marriage market competition induced by local scarcities of women due to male-biased sex ratios.

Suggested Citation

  • Stopnitzky, Yaniv, 2017. "No toilet no bride? Intrahousehold bargaining in male-skewed marriage markets in India," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 127(C), pages 269-282.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:127:y:2017:i:c:p:269-282
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jdeveco.2017.04.003
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    Cited by:

    1. Stopnitzky, Yaniv, 2016. "Changing preferences through experimental games: Evidence from sanitation and hygiene in Tamil Nadu," IFPRI discussion papers 1587, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Deepak Saraswat, 2018. "Gender Composition of Children and Sanitation Behavior In India," Working papers 2018-12, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    3. Rachel Cassidy & Marije Groot Bruinderink & Wendy Janssens & Karlijn Morsink, 2018. "The Power to Protect: Household Bargaining and Female Condom Use," CSAE Working Paper Series 2018-08, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.

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