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Are all perks solely perks? Evidence from corporate jets

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  • Lee, Lian Fen
  • Lowry, Michelle
  • Shu, Susan

Abstract

While shareholders have strong incentives to limit value-destroying perquisite consumption, it is challenging to identify such perquisites. Many corporate assets that enable forms of perquisite consumption also provide operational benefits. Corporate jets represent a potent example. We find business-related flights increase firm performance. Our results also highlight the channels through which jet use can either enhance or destroy firm value. Consistent with the benefits of information gathering and monitoring, firms with soft and complex information that is difficult to transmit remotely are more likely to fly to company subsidiaries and plants, and these flights positively affect firm value. In contrast, among firms with weak governance structures where flights are more likely motivated by agency factors, jet use is more likely to be value-decreasing. The ability to differentiate has important implications in today's activism environment.

Suggested Citation

  • Lee, Lian Fen & Lowry, Michelle & Shu, Susan, 2018. "Are all perks solely perks? Evidence from corporate jets," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 460-473.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:corfin:v:48:y:2018:i:c:p:460-473
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jcorpfin.2017.11.014
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Myers, Stewart C. & Majluf, Nicolás S., 1945-, 1984. "Corporate financing and investment decisions when firms have information that investors do not have," Working papers 1523-84., Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Sloan School of Management.
    2. Rajan, Raghuram G. & Wulf, Julie, 2006. "Are perks purely managerial excess?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(1), pages 1-33, January.
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    6. Yermack, David, 2014. "Tailspotting: Identifying and profiting from CEO vacation trips," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 113(2), pages 252-269.
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    10. Yermack, David, 2006. "Flights of fancy: Corporate jets, CEO perquisites, and inferior shareholder returns," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(1), pages 211-242, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Li, Bin & Yao, Yao & Shahab, Yasir & Li, Hai-Xia & Ntim, Collins G., 2020. "Parent-subsidiary dispersion and executive excess perks consumption," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 70(C).
    2. Bushee, Brian J. & Gerakos, Joseph & Lee, Lian Fen, 2018. "Corporate jets and private meetings with investors," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(2), pages 358-379.

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